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Post 3.11: What Can Art Do? Four Years On: Art and the Disaster
Public Seminar: INEMURI: The Art of Napping in Japan new
Artist talk by SHIMURAbros
Learn & Teach Primary Japanese!
Japan Foundation at London Anime & Gaming Con July 2015 new
Japan Foundation at Hyper Japan Festival July 2015 new
J-Basic Online for Teachers 2015
The Japan Foundation & SOAS Language and Culture Course (Beginner Level) - Term 3
J-CLan Initiative: Introduction to Japanese Culture and Language Teaching in Primary Education
Eastern Exchanges: East Asian Craft and Design

Post 3.11: What Can Art Do? Four Years On: Art and the Disaster   org

Post 3.11 is a series of talks showcasing the activities of artists who through various ways, have been engaged with the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in the Tohoku region of Japan. The series aims to re-examine the role of artists and art in the aftermath of such unprecedented events.

Four years have now passed since 3.11 and despite a new phase beginning in the areas affected, there are still a great number of problems to overcome. Marking the fourth anniversary of the disaster, the fourth session of this talk series will look into artists’ interactions with the affected areas a few years on, as opposed to the immediate response. Considering particularly the context of the ‘post’ aftermath, what does it mean for artists and cultural sectors to be involved at this stage, and what can they achieve themselves?

Broadening the focal point from specifically 3.11 to more global and historical events, the event will also explore how artists can be engaged once time has passed and the dust has settled, fundamentally questioning  ‘what can art do’.

Panellists:

Yoi Kawakubo is an emerging artist and photographer, who has been tracing the social and historical impact of the disaster and subsequent nuclear meltdown through his artistic practice. Kawakubo’s interests lie in the themes of the ontology of photography and the boundaries of the medium. Kawakubo was selected as the Art Action UK residency artist for 2015 and will exhibit his work at the solo exhibition To Tell a (hi)Story at the Husk Gallery, Limehouse, London from 16 -30 May 2015.

Prof David Alexander is Professor at the Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction at University College London, and teaches emergency planning and management. Prof Alexander’s research interests include the relationship between the culture and the disaster in the aftermath, focusing on how cultural activities have contributed to the recovery of the disaster. Prof Alexander has conducted research into the Tohoku area and other global areas where disasters have struck.

Eiko Honda is a curator and Fellow of Overseas Study Programme for Artists, Japanese Agency for Cultural Affairs. Her recent projects include Noodles Against the Machine: the Politics of Food and Artists’ Resistance in Contemporary Japan (2014), Unlocking the Diary: The Archiving of Nameless Memories (2014) and NOW&FUTURE: JAPAN (2012). She is currently working on Meiji-era naturalist Minakata Kumagusu and his relation to ecological thought today.

Dr Majella Munro is a writer and consultant with expertise on modern and contemporary Asian art. Dr Munro is currently completing a research monograph ‘Close to Nature? Japanese Artists and the Environment from Hiroshima to Fukushima’ focusing on Japanese contemporary artists’ response to 3.11.

Kaori Homma (chair) is Associate Lecturer at University of Arts London a coordinator of Art Action UK, a collection of artists, curators, gallerists and writers who are exploring various means to show solidarity and support for people who have been affected by disasters. The 2011 Japanese earthquake, tsunami and subsequent Fukushima nuclear fallout has been the catalyst for AAUK's activities.


Date: 28 May 2015 from 6.30pm
Venue:

Free Word Centre
60 Farringdon Road, London EC1R 3GA


Booking

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To book a place, please visit: https://freewordcentre.com/events/detail/post-3.11-what-can-art-do

Image: When the mist takes off the suns, 2014 © Yoi Kawakubo

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Public Seminar: INEMURI: The Art of Napping in Japan   org

Japan is known for long working hours and a strong work ethic, and recent polls have shown that Japanese workers enjoy less sleep at night than workers in any other country. Yet, one thing that surprises many foreign visitors to Japan is the number of people in public that can be seen napping during the day, whether in the train or in a restaurant, in the classroom or in the office, or even in a TV broadcast from parliament.

This practice of sleeping in a situation not meant for sleep is known as inemuri in Japanese, which literally translates as ‘to be asleep while present’.

In a society that prizes dedication to hard work, and where many people seem to sacrifice nocturnal sleep for work and study, why is sleeping on the job tolerated?

This is a question that puzzled Dr Brigitte Steger, Senior Lecturer in Modern Japanese Studies at the University of Cambridge, which led her to write a book on the topic which entered the bestseller charts in Japan.

In this seminar Dr Steger will explore the phenomenon of inemuri  in Japanese society, as well as the unwritten  social rules that govern the practice. Far from being a sign of laziness, inemuri  has even been linked to better productivity. Dr Steger will be joined in discussion with sleep expert Dr Robert Meadows (University of Surrey) to compare attitudes to sleep in the UK and Japan and discuss whether anything can be learned from the custom in the UK where the demands of modern life have led to an increase in sleep deprivation.

Image: Stéphane Bidouze


Date: 4 June 2015 from 6.30pm
Venue:

Nunn Hall, Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London,  WC1H 0AL


Booking: The event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please send an email to event@jpf.org.uk.

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Artist talk by SHIMURAbros   org

SHIMURAbros are the sister and brother artist duo of Yuka and Kentaro Shimura, currently researchers at Studio Olafur Eliasson and exemplifying a new breed of Japanese contemporary artists. Working and exhibiting internationally, SHIMURAbros are known for incorporating elements of sculpture, installation and avant-garde filmmaking in their work. Film is the catalyst to all their creations and the artists employ different techniques to each work. As an exploration of the history of moving images approached from a fundamentally different perspective extending film beyond its two-dimensional limit - their installations are an intricate and playful re-working of film and cinematic language.

Programmed in partnership with Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, home to the British ArtistsFilm & Video Study Collection which holds a large amount of material for academic research in artists' moving image, this talk will highlight SHIMURAbros’ film and moving image installations, with a focus on the artistic content, formalistic qualities and contexts at play in working within the canon. The talk will be followed by discussion with Keith Whittle, researcher and Japan Foundation Fellow, exploring the role technology, cinematic history and popular culture has on the aesthetic and conceptual approach the artists' have to their work, in terms of research and exhibition.

SHIMURAbros have exhibited widely including at Art Basel Hong Kong; 798 Art Factory; The National Art Centre, Tokyo; NUS Museum Singapore; MOCA (Museum of Contemporary Art Taipei); PICA(the Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts Museum), Australia; Museums Quartier, Vienna. "SEKILALA" received the Excellence Prize (Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Prize) at the 13th Japan Media Arts Festival.


Date: 5 June 2015 from 6.30pm
Venue:

LVMH Lecture Theatre (E003), Central Saint Martins
Granary Building, 1 Granary Square, King's Cross, London N1C 4AA


Booking:

The event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please send an email to event@jpf.org.uk

Image: SHIMURAbros, X-RAY TRAIN, 2007-2009, Installation, Image (black and white / X-Ray CT), Special liquid crystal film, Iron, Wire, PC, Control board, Projector, Railroad tie, Dimension variable. Courtesy of the artist and Tokyo Gallery+BTAP

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Learn & Teach Primary Japanese!   org

Discover how to teach Japanese language to primary level pupils...through learning Japanese yourself!

As of September 2014 it is compulsory for all maintained primary schools in England to teach at least one foreign language at Key Stage 2. In response to this, the Japan Foundation London is holding a series of workshops and events to help prepare primary teachers who are teaching, or would like to teach, Japanese language.

In this two day course, primary school teachers with little or no prior knowledge of Japanese will have the opportunity not only to learn the basics of Japanese language and culture, but also how to impart their new knowledge on to their pupils.

The course will include content from the Japan Foundation Japanese Scheme of Work for Primary Schools, which is packed full of lesson plans, resources and exciting and fun ideas for teaching primary-level Japanese. We will also give advice on funding, resources and other assistance available to get Japanese classes up and running at your school. On the second day, you will even be able to have the chance to practise your Japanese while making authentic sushi!

This is an incredible opportunity for primary school teachers to learn new language skills that will benefit your entire school – don’t miss out!
 

“The teacher was brilliant and the course was well prepared and delivered.” (Rishi Gohil, 2014 participant)

“I loved the writing aspect- this really helped to clarify the different alphabets and their uses.” (Kimberley Devonshire, 2014 participant)

Fee: £20.00 (includes all course materials and ingredients for sushi-making)

Click here to register your place

Please note that spaces are limited – first come, first served. This course is for teachers with absolute beginner level, or those who have only studied a little Japanese. Priority will be given to teachers, or those training to teach, at a primary school. 
Timetable available to download below.

Please note that spaces are limited. This course is for teachers with absolute beginner level, or those who have only studied a little Japanese. Priority will be given to teachers, or those training to teach, at a primary school. 

Timetable available to download below


Date: 27 May 2015 - 28 May 2015 from 10.30am
Venue:

UCL Institute of Education (Day 1) & Kuriya Keiko Japanese restaurant (Day 2)

Download PrimaryBasic15-Timetable

 This event is generously supported by Kuriya Keiko  

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Japan Foundation at London Anime & Gaming Con July 2015   org

The Japan Foundation will be at London Anime & Gaming Con on 4th and 5th July 2015.

Visit our stand for information about studying Japanese, freebies and the chance to enter our quiz and win some great prizes!

What's more, we will be giving a short Japanese taster session and a presentation on the resources and support available for Japanese language learners at 2pm on the Sunday. 

Booking details and more information about the convention, which is organised by Anime League, can be found on the official website, www.londonanimecon.com


Date: 4 July 2015 - 5 July 2015
Venue:

London Metropolitan University, N7 8DB

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Japan Foundation at Hyper Japan Festival July 2015   org

The Japan Foundation are once again delighted to be exhibiting this July at HYPER JAPAN- the UK’s biggest J-Culture event.

Come and visit our stand to learn how the Japan Foundation can help you learn about Japanese language and culture, get Japanese language started at your school, or simply get involved in events and activities related to Japan.

We’ll also be giving away some exclusive free gifts, as well as holding a Japan Quiz with some fantastic prizes!

For more information and to buy a ticket, please click here to visit the official Hyper Japan website. Tickets on sale now!


Date: 10 July 2015 - 12 July 2015
Venue:

The O2, London

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J-Basic Online for Teachers 2015   org

This online course is for teachers with a basic level of Japanese who would like to build up their language skills. Through the course, you will develop a basic working knowledge of Japanese grammatical structures and build up your confidence and skills in using Japanese effectively in your classroom.  This course is provided by the Japan Foundation Sydney.

Course fee:  A$130 - A$190 (depending on stage) 

Who can sign up?
Any teacher residing in the UK, Australia or New Zealand who has a basic knowledge of Japanese, and can read hiragana and katakana.

What level of Japanese is it suitable for?
Four stages are available. We recommend you take the “level check test” to make sure you choose the best level for you. Stage 1 (the easiest) is suitable for those who know hiragana and katakana.  Stage 4 (the hardest) is about the same level as N5 (old Level 4) of the JLPT.

How does the course work?
Every week a new unit is uploaded. You will work through the unit at your own pace, and then complete your homework by the end of each week. Your homework will be marked and returned to you with helpful advice and comments from our Japanese Language Advisor. 

Feedback from previous participants:

“I have really enjoyed it, the course content is useful as covers all areas of the Japanese language i.e. speaking, listening, reading, writing – lots of writing practice which is a challenge but good practice!”

“I really, really like the Production task, especially as you get some prompt feedback from the Language Advisor. Brilliant!”

 2015 Dates 

  • Term 1 February 2 March 27
    Term 2 May 4 June 26
    Term 3 August 3 September 25
    Term 4 19 October December 11
    Term 1 February 2 - March 27
  • Term 2 May 4- June 26
  • Term 3 August 3 - September 25
  • Term 4 19 October - December 11
Session 1: 3 February – 28 March 2014
Session 2: 31 March – 23 May 2014
Session 3: 26 May – 18 July 2014
Session 4: 21 July – 12 September 2014
Session 5: 15 September– 7 November 2014

Session 6: 24 November 2014 -23 January 2015

 

 For more information and to enrol, please go to http://www.jpf.org.au/jbasic


Date: 3 February 2014 - 23 January 2015
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The Japan Foundation & SOAS Language and Culture Course (Beginner Level) - Term 3   org

Term 3 now closed for further applications

The Japan Foundation & SOAS Language and Culture Course (Beginner Level) is a new kind of course for beginners (JF Standard for Japanese Language Education A1 Breakthrough) of Japanese. It is based on the JF Standard for Japanese Language Education, rather than traditional methods of language education that focus on grammar and sentence structure. The aim of the course will be to use Japanese language skills to get to know people, visit restaurants and take part in many other Japan-related events. At the end of every lesson, participants will be able to perform specific, practical tasks in Japanese.

The course will not focus on language alone; learning Japanese culture will also be an important element in the lessons. The course will incorporate videos, games and media that will help you to learn about Japan and to give you the opportunity to use your new Japanese skills outside of the classroom. You will also have access to the supplementary MARUGOTO+ Japanese Learning websiteThis course is perfect for beginners of Japanese who would like to use their new language skills in practical situations and really connect with Japanese society.

  • Term 3 Dates: 23rd April 2015 – 23rd June 2015 (every Thursday)19:00 - 21:00
  • Course Leader: Mr Shinichiro Okajima, SOAS Language Centre
  • Venue: SOAS, University of London 
  • Course Fee: £330 per term, including course textbook and materials 

I liked the pace of the course and was surprised we learned hiragana and katakana [Japanese writing] so quickly. As it was an introductory course, I felt the balance was right for people who were complete beginners  and self-studying students like myself who had a little bit of language under my belt already. I certainly feel, after learning about ordering food, that I would be able to do this in Japan.” - JP Rutter, former course participant.

For more information to book your place please click here to visit the SOAS website. 

For full information about the course timetable, future term dates etc. please download the flier below.

Other Japanese courses organised by SOAS can be found here.


Date: 23 April 2015 - 23 June 2015 from 7.00pm
Venue:

Download JpLangCult 2014-2015
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J-CLan Initiative: Introduction to Japanese Culture and Language Teaching in Primary Education   JPsupported

 

This event takes the form of a half-day session for primary and secondary school teachers around Edinburgh, organised in order to give an introduction to the potential of teaching Japanese in primary schools in Scotland.
We will be showcasing ways in which Japanese language can be approached in the classroom, how an interest in Japanese can develop into a career, and the commonalities that are shared between Japan and Scotland.
This event includes student-led presentations introducing the J-CLan Initiative and the personal reflections on studying Japanese at a higher education level, speeches by leaders in the field of Japanese education in Britain, cultural demonstrations in the form of hands-on workshops, and a traditional Japanese performance. 
The running order of the day as follows:
12:45 - 13:30 Registration open (Lunch provided)
13:30 - 13:35 Welcome from the University of Edinburgh
13:35 - 14:05 Talk from Anne Rajakumar (Head of Japanese, Hockerill Anglo-European College)
14:10 - 15:00 Presentations on learning Japanese from current students of Japanese from the University of Edinburgh. 
15:00 - 15:20 Coffee break (Participants will have the opportunity to participate in a number of traditional craft workshops during this break)
15:20 - 16:05 Hanko stamp making workshop run by Mio Tsunematsu (Japan Foundation London)
16:05 - 16:25 Demonstration by the University of Edinburgh's Shorinji Kempo Doko.
16:25 - 16:40 "What Japanese can offer you and your students" Talk from Dr Yoko Matsumoto-Sturt (The University of Edinburgh)
16:40 - 16:45 Closing Remarks

This event takes the form of a half-day session for primary and secondary school teachers around Edinburgh, organised in order to give an introduction to the potential of teaching Japanese in primary schools in Scotland.

We will be showcasing ways in which Japanese language can be approached in the classroom, how an interest in Japanese can develop into a career, and the commonalities that are shared between Japan and Scotland.

This event includes student-led presentations introducing the J-CLan Initiative and the personal reflections on studying Japanese at a higher education level, speeches by leaders in the field of Japanese education in Britain, cultural demonstrations in the form of hands-on workshops, and a traditional Japanese performance. The running order of the day as follows:

12:45 - 13:30 Registration open (Lunch provided)
13:30 - 13:35 Welcome from the University of Edinburgh
13:35 - 14:05 Talk from Anne Rajakumar (Head of Japanese, Hockerill Anglo-European College)
14:10 - 15:00 Presentations on learning Japanese from current students of Japanese from the University of Edinburgh. 
15:00 - 15:20 Coffee break (Participants will have the opportunity to participate in a number of traditional craft workshops during this break)
15:20 - 16:05 Hanko stamp making workshop run by Mio Tsunematsu (Japan Foundation London)
16:05 - 16:25 Demonstration by the University of Edinburgh's Shorinji Kempo Doko.
16:25 - 16:40 "What Japanese can offer you and your students" Talk from Dr Yoko Matsumoto-Sturt (The University of Edinburgh)
16:40 - 16:45 Closing Remarks

Click here to book your place.

A flier for this event is available to download below.


Date: 22 May 2015 from 1.00pm
Venue:

The University of Edinburgh
Project Room, 50 George Square 
EH8 9JU Edinburgh
United Kingdom

Download Friday 22nd May J-CLan Event

 

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Eastern Exchanges: East Asian Craft and Design   JPsupported

This exhibition will trace the history and future of East Asian craft and design and its global influence in this exhibition inspired by objects from Manchester Art Gallery’s collection. The show features over 1,500 years of the rich craft heritage of Japan, China and Korea: ceramics, metalwork, furniture, lacquer, textiles and sculpture, with exhibits ranging from magnificent court treasures, to masterpieces by contemporary makers.

There will be opportunities to see historic works from Manchester’s collection which have not been exhibited for over 30 years, including an exquisite early nineteenth century Japanese lacquer norimono (travelling carriage) and hand-chiselled Japanese tsuba (sword guards), which are being conserved especially for this show. Contemporary work includes Fumio Enomoto’s ‘Weave Stool’, commissioned specially from the award-winning designer, plus elegant ceramics by Yasuko Sakurai.


Date: 2 April 2015 - 31 May 2015
Venue:

Manchester Art Gallery, Manchester


For more information, please click here.

Image: Yasuko Sakurai, Orb 2012

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