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Japanese Study Seminar in Alsace 2015: Call for Participation! new
Japan Foundation at London Anime & Gaming Con July 2015
SAKE: Tradition Meets Innovation - The Story of the First Non-Japanese Sake Master Brewer new
Japan Foundation at Hyper Japan Festival July 2015
Inside the Industry: ANIME
Central and Local Governance in Japan and the UK: Lessons from Okinawa and Scotland new
Japanese Refresher Course for Teachers 2015
Summer Explorers! Japanese Anime Screenings new
Japanese from Scratch: All About Bento! new
J-Basic Online for Teachers 2015
The Japan Foundation & SOAS Language and Culture Course (Beginner Level) - Term 3
Japan Group Tour Programme for UK Head Teachers 2015
Takehisa Kosugi: SPACINGS

Japanese Study Seminar in Alsace 2015: Call for Participation!   org

The deadline for applications has been extended until July 15 2015.

The Japan Foundation and Centre Européen d'Etudes Japonaises d'Alsace (CEEJA) are now accepting applications for participation in Japanese Study Seminar: Everyday Life and Culture (日常生活文化) scheduled for 21st and 22nd September, 2015 at CEEJA, in Kientzheim, France. The official language of the seminar will be JAPANESE.

This seminar aims to encourage networking among young researchers on Japan in Europe and further promote Japanese Studies in Europe.

Participants will join a two-day intensive workshop in the cozy and intimate atmosphere of CEEJA's facility in Kientzheim where they will present and discuss their current research projects with fellow participants and guest mentors from Japan.

The theme of this year’s seminar will be “Everyday Life and Culture (日常生活文化).”  We are calling for applications from young researchers in Europe specialising in politics, history, sociology, literature, arts, language, philosophy, economics, architecture, religion, etc. 

Please note that the deadlnie for applications has been extended to 15th July, 2015.

For further details including eligibility and application procedures, please visit the Japan Foundation Tokyo website here.


Date: 21 September 2015 - 22 September 2015
Venue:

Centre Européen d'Etudes Japonaises d'Alsace (CEEJA), Kientzheim, France


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Japan Foundation at London Anime & Gaming Con July 2015   org

The Japan Foundation will be at London Anime & Gaming Con on 4th and 5th July 2015.

Visit our stand for information about studying Japanese, freebies and the chance to enter our quiz and win some great prizes!

What's more, we will be giving a short Japanese taster session and a presentation on the resources and support available for Japanese language learners at 2:30 on the Saturday, and again at 2:00 on the Sunday. 

Booking details and more information about the convention, which is organised by Anime League, can be found on the official website, www.londonanimecon.com


Date: 4 July 2015 - 5 July 2015
Venue:

London Metropolitan University, N7 8DB

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SAKE: Tradition Meets Innovation - The Story of the First Non-Japanese Sake Master Brewer   org

The brewing of sake is a craft steeped with tradition, but one which has risen to many new challenges in modern times.

Philip Harper has a unique perspective on tradition and innovation in the world of sake, having worked for more than 20 years in the industry, and being the only non-Japanese to have earned the prestigious title of ‘toji’ or master brewer.

Japanese sake has played an important role in Japanese culture since ancient times, but in recent times social change had pushed sake towards the periphery of Japanese lifestyle. In response to this, innovative efforts have been made to revitalise the sake market within Japan, as well as to widen its appeal internationally.

In this special talk, through sharing his own experiences of learning the complex and sometimes arcane traditions of sake-brewing, Philip Harper will also shed light on how the sake industry has responded to recent challenges, preserving traditional methods and wisdom, while adopting new modern techniques in production and marketing.

Philip’s own range of sake embodies this marriage of innovation and tradition, bucking modern trends to brew to traditional forgotten recipes, and using adventurous techniques to create new flavours.

At this special seminar, held in the grand Conway Hall, guests will not only have the rare opportunity to put their questions to a toji, but they will also be able to sample some of Phillip’s sake from the award-winning Kinoshita Brewery in Kyoto.

Also joining us will be Rie Yoshitake who will introduce the activities of the Sake Samurai association, an organisation formed by young sake brewers in Japan which works to protect sake traditions and to promote sake in overseas markets.

Image (right): Tsukinokatsura, Hyogo


Date: 6 July 2015 from 6.45pm
Venue:

Conway Hall, London, WC1R 4RL


Booking:

**This event is now FULLY BOOKED**  

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Japan Foundation at Hyper Japan Festival July 2015   org

The Japan Foundation are once again delighted to be exhibiting this July at HYPER JAPAN- the UK’s biggest J-Culture event.

Come and visit our stand to learn how the Japan Foundation can help you learn about Japanese language and culture, get Japanese language started at your school, or simply get involved in events and activities related to Japan.

We’ll also be giving away some exclusive free gifts, as well as holding a Japan Quiz with some fantastic prizes!

For more information and to buy a ticket, please click here to visit the official Hyper Japan website. Tickets on sale now!


Date: 10 July 2015 - 12 July 2015
Venue:

The O2, London

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Inside the Industry: ANIME   org

Anime is one of Japan’s most popular and prolific cultural exports. Across a wide range of productions and vast number of styles and genres, it has developed to become an iconic aspect of Japanese culture, continuing to attract legions of fans and inspire animators worldwide. But where exactly do our favourite TV series and films begin before becoming domestic and international hits and what makes them successful?

This event will bring together seminal figures in the anime industry to discuss the practical aspects of their respective positions in the business, and outline the challenges which animators, writers and producers face today. The speakers will take you on a journey through the tough but fascinating world of anime production, right from the very earliest sketches to the finished product in all its animated glory.

Following on from a successful event held in 2012, this talk will provide you further with (almost!) everything you always wanted to know about the anime industry.

Hirokatsu Kihara began working at Top Craft, which produced Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, before joining Studio Ghibli in 1985, working with Hayao Miyazaki on Castle in the Sky, My Neighbour Totoro and Kiki’s Delivery Service. After leaving Studio Ghibli in 1990, Kihara made his writing debut with the ghost story Shin Mimi Bukuro, which went on to sell over 1,200,000 copies and has since gone on to complete 10 volumes.

Michihiko Suwa is Chief Producer at the Animation Department of Yomiuri TV and self-proclaimed manga-fanatic, and has been working as an animation producer since in 1986. His first work as a producer was the anime television series Robotan, before working on a number of hit television series and film adaptations including Detective Conan (Case Closed), City Hunter, InuYasha, Black Jack, Yawara! and Magic Knight Rayearth.

Aya Suzuki is a 2D Character/FX animator, layout artist and animation lecturer. Projects Suzuki has worked on in Japan and overseas include Hayao Miyazaki's The Wind Rises (2013) at Studio Ghibli, The Illusionist (2010) (Dir. Sylvain Chomet, Django Films), Wolf Children (2012) (Dir. Mamoru Hosoda, Studio Chizu) and The Dreaming Machine (Dir. Satoshi Kon, Madhouse).

Stephen Cavalier (chair) has two decades experience in the animation and games industries, during which time he has worked as series director / animation director on TV series' for Disney, BBC and Channel4 and has written and directed award winning short films, music videos and TV commercials in both animation and live action. His book The World History of Animation and his animated storybook game Alph and Betty’s Topsy Turvy World were published recently and he is currently directing a CG preschool series for Disney in London.


Date: 13 July 2015 from 6.30pm
Venue:

London Metropolitan University, Moorgate Campus
Electra House, 84 Moorgate, London EC2M 6SQ

For details of how to reach the venue, please click here


Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To book your place via Eventbrite, please click here.

Image credits (left to right): © 志水アキ/木原浩勝; © 鯛夢/ホーム社/KADOKAWA; © 武若丸/神楽坂淳/木原浩勝/ホーム社/集英社;  © 東毅/小学館・読売テレビ・A-1 Pictures 2015; © 2015青山剛昌/名探偵コナン製作委員会
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Central and Local Governance in Japan and the UK: Lessons from Okinawa and Scotland   org

The coral reefs, white sand beaches and sub-tropical rainforests of Okinawa, a chain of islands stretching over 600 miles of ocean between Southwest Japan and Taiwan, seem a distant world from the misty mountains and lochs of Scotland, but recent political developments in Scotland have brought to light some surprising parallels.

The corareefs, white sand beaches and sub-tropical rainforests of Okinawa, a chain of islands stretching over 600 miles of ocean between Southwest Japan and Taiwan, seem a distant world from the misty mountains and lochs of Scotland, but recent political developments in Scotland have brought to light some surprising parallels.
Likes Scotland, Okinawa is a smaller, once independent, area incorporated within a far larger entity, which possesses its own distinct history, culture and  political outlook. Debate on the balance between central and local governance has recently taken prominence in political discussion in Okinawa, and last September, intrigued by recent events in Scotland, several Okinawan journalists and researchers, including the founding member of a small but growing Okinawa independence movement, flew to Edinburgh to observe the independence  referendum.
Professor Takayoshi Egami (Waseda University), is an expert in regional policy in Okinawa, having worked as a lecturer and researcher at the University of the Ryukyus in Okinawa for over 26 years. Since last September, he has spent one year as a visiting researcher at the University of Edinburgh to draw lessons from developments in devolution in Scotland post referendum.
In this seminar Professor Egami will discuss the complex historical and political background of Okinawa prefecture, which lies behind recent interest in devolution in the region.
After his talk he will be joined for a comparative discussion on devolution in the UK and Japan by Professor Paul Cairney, Professor of Politics and Public Policy at the University of Stirling, an expert in both Scottish politics and UK-wide comparative public policy.
Recent discussion on devolution and regionalisation in the UK and Japan has not been confined to Scotland and Okinawa of course. Recent hot topics in the UK have included devolving more powers to Wales, ‘The Northern Powerhouse’ and the development of London as a city state, while in Japan,  debate was recently ignited  over  plans to devolve more powers to Osaka City. Through exploring some of these issues, Prof Cairney and Prof Egami will discuss what can be learned from the experience of each country and how regionalisation may develop in future years.
The seminar will be followed by an opportunity to pose your own devolution-related questions to the experts, and a drinks reception.The coral reefs, white sand beaches and sub-tropical rainforests of Okinawa, a chain of islands stretching over 600 miles of ocean between Southwest Japan and Taiwan, seem a distant world from the misty mountains and lochs of Scotland, but recent political developments in Scotland have brought to light some surprising parallels.

Like Scotland, Okinawa is a smaller, once independent, area incorporated within a far larger entity, which possesses its own distinct history, culture and  political outlook. Debate on the balance between central and local governance has recently taken prominence in political discussion in Okinawa, and last September, intrigued by recent events in Scotland, several Okinawan journalists and researchers, including the founding member of an Okinawa independence movement, flew to Edinburgh to observe the independence  referendum.

Professor Takayoshi Egami (Waseda University), is an expert in regional policy in Okinawa, having worked as a lecturer and researcher at the University of the Ryukyus in Okinawa for over 26 years. Since last September, he has spent one year as a visiting researcher at the University of Edinburgh to draw lessons from developments in devolution in Scotland post referendum.

In this seminar Professor Egami will discuss the complex historical and political background of Okinawa prefecture, which lies behind recent interest in devolution in the region.

After his talk he will be joined for a comparative discussion on devolution in the UK and Japan by Professor Paul Cairney, Professor of Politics and Public Policy at the University of Stirling, an expert in both Scottish politics and UK-wide comparative public policy.

Recent discussion on devolution and regionalism in the UK and Japan has not been confined to Scotland and Okinawa of course. Recent hot topics in the UK have included devolving more powers to Wales, the 'Northern Powerhouse’ and even the development of London as a city state, while in Japan, debate was recently ignited  over  plans to devolve more powers to Osaka City. Through exploring some of these issues, Professor Cairney and Professor Egami will discuss what can be learned from the experience of each country and how regionalism may develop in future years.

The seminar will be followed by an opportunity to pose your own devolution-related questions to the experts, and a drinks reception.

Image (left): Martin M303/Shutterstock.com

Image (right): (c)Tomo.Yun (http://www.yunphoto.net)


Date: 22 July 2015 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Swedenborg Society, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London, WC1A 2TH


Booking: The event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please send an email to event@jpf.org.uk.

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Japanese Refresher Course for Teachers 2015   org

This is a free, intensive language course for teachers who want to improve their Japanese language teaching skills, as well as their own language ability.

The theme for the 2015 course is 「日本の最新事情」- "The Latest from Japan." The aim of the course will be to update your knowledge about Japanese society and culture, while at the same time brushing up your own Japanese language ability. We will also explore various classroom activities and ideas for teaching Japanese.

This course will be held at two levels: Intermediate (approx. JLPT N3) and Advanced (approx. JLPT N2 & N1), which will both be held simultaneously in the same classroom, divided into two groups. If you have never passed the JLPT for N3 or above, you will need to take an online placement test within 1 week applying in order to determine which group will be best suited for you; those who cannot take the test online will have the opportunity to take it on the first day of the course before the lessons start.

  • When: 28th, 29th & 30th July 2015, 10:30 - 16:00, with a lunch break between 12:45 - 13:45
  • Where: River Room, King’s College London, Strand Campus, Strand, London. WC2R 2LS
  • Participation Fee: This course is free, but participants must cover their own travel, accommodation and lunch costs.
  • Open to: This course is for non-native speaking teachers of approximately JLPT N3 level (or JF Standard B1 level) Japanese and above, as well as teachers and PGCE students who have the chance to offer Japanese in future. All the lectures and discussions will be held in Japanese. Please note that spaces are limited. Priority will be given to teachers based at UK schools.

Feedback from last year's participants:

“Very useful practice. Excellent tips from JF staff, especially on grammar and very resourceful participants.” (Olga Saburova, Rochester Grammar School)

“Very good balance of activities: song/dance/manga/grammar etc, targeting a wide range of age groups and abilities.” (Forum Mithani, Westminster Kingsway College)

“Overall, this was an excellent course. I would recommend it to all teachers of Japanese.”
(Robert Fox, Aston University)

>>> Click here to apply <<<


Date: 28 July 2015 - 30 July 2015 from 10.30am
Venue:

River Room, King’s College London, Strand Campus, Strand, London. WC2R 2LS

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Summer Explorers! Japanese Anime Screenings   org


This summer the Japan Foundation have organised a day packed full of special anime film screenings, all of which can be enjoyed on the big screen! 

11:30am: Anime for Everyone! (Recommended for ages 2+)
KOMANEKO – The Curious Cat

1:00pm: Anime Goes Underground (Recommended for ages 8+)
SOS! TOKYO METRO EXPLORERS: THE NEXT

2:10pm: Anime Meets (Recommended for ages 10+)
Negadon: The Monster from Mars
Kakurenbo: Hide and Seek
Planzet

4:15pm: Retro Anime (Recommended for ages 8+)
Science Ninja Team Gatchaman: The Movie
Featuring an intro by Japanese anime expert Helen McCarthy


Date: 1 August 2015 from 11.30am
Venue:

BAFTA, 195 Piccadilly, London W1J 9LN
Nearest tube station: Piccadilly Circus or Green Park



To download the flyer, please click here
 

 

Booking:

These screenings are free to attend but booking is essential. To book a place, please visit: summerexplorers.eventbrite.co.uk

Main image (from top to bottom): Negadon: The Monster from Mars (© Jun Awazu/CoMix Wave Films) (part); KOMANEKO - The Curious Cat (© amis de Komaneko) (part); Science Ninja Team Gatchaman: The Movie (© TATSUNOKO PRODUCTION Co., Ltd.) (part); Kakurenbo: Hide and Seek (© YAMATOWORKS/D.I.C) (part)

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Japanese from Scratch: All About Bento!   org

Japanese from Scratch workshops are held by the Japan Foundation for those who are interested in learning Japanese but haven't started yet, or those who have just started learning Japanese. In September’s workshop, you can get a taste of the Japanese language while discovering the fascinating culture of bento – Japanese boxed meals!

The culture of making meals in bento boxes has existed for centuries in Japan, and continues to be popular in modern society. In recent years, bento have attracted worldwide attention for their practicality, creativity and attractive nature.

In this workshop, you will have the chance to learn:

  • All about Japan’s culture of bento and the characteristics of a typical bento meal

  • How to talk about your favourite food in Japanese  

  • Essential Japanese language skills for dining in Japan

We hope this event will give participants a taste for studying more Japanese language, and a craving to visit Japan themselves!

When: 8th or 9th September 2015 (Content is the same each day),  19:00 – 20:30   

Participation Fee: £5.00

Click here to register your place


Date: 8 September 2015 - 9 September 2015 from 7.00pm
Venue:

Bertrand Russell Room, Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1R 


Photo credits: gamene (centre, bottom right), Keiichi Yas (top right), Melanie M (bottom left), via Flickr.com

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J-Basic Online for Teachers 2015   org

This online course is for teachers with a basic level of Japanese who would like to build up their language skills. Through the course, you will develop a basic working knowledge of Japanese grammatical structures and build up your confidence and skills in using Japanese effectively in your classroom.  This course is provided by the Japan Foundation Sydney.

Course fee:  A$130 - A$190 (depending on stage) 

Who can sign up?
Any teacher residing in the UK, Australia or New Zealand who has a basic knowledge of Japanese, and can read hiragana and katakana.

What level of Japanese is it suitable for?
Four stages are available. We recommend you take the “level check test” to make sure you choose the best level for you. Stage 1 (the easiest) is suitable for those who know hiragana and katakana.  Stage 4 (the hardest) is about the same level as N5 (old Level 4) of the JLPT.

How does the course work?
Every week a new unit is uploaded. You will work through the unit at your own pace, and then complete your homework by the end of each week. Your homework will be marked and returned to you with helpful advice and comments from our Japanese Language Advisor. 

Feedback from previous participants:

“I have really enjoyed it, the course content is useful as covers all areas of the Japanese language i.e. speaking, listening, reading, writing – lots of writing practice which is a challenge but good practice!”

“I really, really like the Production task, especially as you get some prompt feedback from the Language Advisor. Brilliant!”

 2015 Dates 

  • Term 1 February 2 March 27
    Term 2 May 4 June 26
    Term 3 August 3 September 25
    Term 4 19 October December 11
    Term 1 February 2 - March 27
  • Term 2 May 4- June 26
  • Term 3 August 3 - September 25
  • Term 4 19 October - December 11
Session 1: 3 February – 28 March 2014
Session 2: 31 March – 23 May 2014
Session 3: 26 May – 18 July 2014
Session 4: 21 July – 12 September 2014
Session 5: 15 September– 7 November 2014

Session 6: 24 November 2014 -23 January 2015

 

 For more information and to enrol, please go to http://www.jpf.org.au/jbasic


Date: 3 February 2014 - 23 January 2015
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The Japan Foundation & SOAS Language and Culture Course (Beginner Level) - Term 3   org

Term 3 now closed for further applications

The Japan Foundation & SOAS Language and Culture Course (Beginner Level) is a new kind of course for beginners (JF Standard for Japanese Language Education A1 Breakthrough) of Japanese. It is based on the JF Standard for Japanese Language Education, rather than traditional methods of language education that focus on grammar and sentence structure. The aim of the course will be to use Japanese language skills to get to know people, visit restaurants and take part in many other Japan-related events. At the end of every lesson, participants will be able to perform specific, practical tasks in Japanese.

The course will not focus on language alone; learning Japanese culture will also be an important element in the lessons. The course will incorporate videos, games and media that will help you to learn about Japan and to give you the opportunity to use your new Japanese skills outside of the classroom. You will also have access to the supplementary MARUGOTO+ Japanese Learning websiteThis course is perfect for beginners of Japanese who would like to use their new language skills in practical situations and really connect with Japanese society.

  • Term 3 Dates: 23rd April 2015 – 23rd June 2015 (every Thursday)19:00 - 21:00
  • Course Leader: Mr Shinichiro Okajima, SOAS Language Centre
  • Venue: SOAS, University of London 
  • Course Fee: £330 per term, including course textbook and materials 

I liked the pace of the course and was surprised we learned hiragana and katakana [Japanese writing] so quickly. As it was an introductory course, I felt the balance was right for people who were complete beginners  and self-studying students like myself who had a little bit of language under my belt already. I certainly feel, after learning about ordering food, that I would be able to do this in Japan.” - JP Rutter, former course participant.

For more information to book your place please click here to visit the SOAS website. 

For full information about the course timetable, future term dates etc. please download the flier below.

Other Japanese courses organised by SOAS can be found here.


Date: 23 April 2015 - 23 June 2015 from 7.00pm
Venue:

Download JpLangCult 2014-2015
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Japan Group Tour Programme for UK Head Teachers 2015   org


As part of the Japan Foundation’s Primary Japanese Campaign to support and encourage primary schools teaching Japanese language, we will be giving 20 primary head teachers the opportunity to take a study trip to Japan from Saturday 24th October to Saturday 31st October on the Japan Group Tour Programme for UK Head Teachers 2015. 

The programme will include Japanese cultural experiences to help deepen your understanding of Japan, as well as visits to Japanese school to observe the Japanese education system first-hand. It will also provide an excellent opportunity to network with teachers in Japan, as well as with other head teachers in the UK whose schools are enthusiastic about Japanese. The Japan Foundation will cover all travel, accommodation and meal expenses. You can see a report about last year’s tour here and you can see photos of the tour here.

We are looking for sign-ups from headteachers in primary schools that fit any one of the criteria below (1-3.) If your school’s head teacher is unable to join us on this tour, we can accept applications to send deputy headteachers in their place.  However, please ask your headteacher to fill in the application for you as we will only accept applications through headteachers. The Japan Foundation reserves the right to choose which schools will participate in this programme.

  1. Primary schools that are interested in introducing Japanese onto their main curriculum. 
  2. Primary schools that are interesting in providing extracurricular activities (Japanese clubs)
  3. Primary schools that already teach Japanese that would like to share their ideas with other schools in their area and spread the teaching of Japanese to other schools.  

We are now taking applications for this programme. Please click here to register your interest. Deadline for applications is 15th July 2015.

The programme will include Japanese cultural experiences to help deepen your understanding of Japan, as well as visits to Japanese school to observe the Japanese education system first-hand. It will also provide an excellent opportunity to network with teachers in Japan, as well as with other head teachers in the UK whose schools are enthusiastic about Japanese. The Japan Foundation will cover all travel, accommodation and meal expenses. You can see a report about last year’s tour here (http://www.jpf.org.uk/news.view.php?id=352) and you can see photos of the tour here (https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.692724727489464.1073741833.269104933184781&type=3).
We are looking for sign-ups from headteachers in primary schools that fit any one of the criteria below (1-3.) If your school’s head teacher is unable to join us on this tour, we can accept applications to send deputy headteachers in their place.  However, please ask your headteacher to fill in the application for you as we will only accept applications through headteachers. The Japan Foundation reserves the right to choose which schools will participate in this programme.
1. Primary schools that are interested in introducing Japanese onto their main curriculum. 
2. Primary schools that are interesting in providing extracurricular activities (Japanese clubs)
3. Primary schools that already teach Japanese that would like to share their ideas with other schools in their area and spread the teaching of Japanese to other schools. 

 


Date: 24 October 2015 - 31 October 2015

Please click here to register your interest. Deadline for applications is 15th July 2015.

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Takehisa Kosugi: SPACINGS   JPsupported

The Ikon Gallery present the first major exhibition by Japanese composer and artist Takehisa Kosugi. Kosugi was a pioneer of experimental music in Japan in the early 1960s and is considered to be one of the most influential artists of his generation. The exhibition will feature three of the artist’s sound installations, involving everyday materials and radio electronics, and interacting with wind, electricity and light.


Date: 22 July 2015 - 27 September 2015
Venue:

Ikon Gallery, Birmingham


For more information, please click here.

Image: Takehisa Kosugi. Interspersion for Light and Sound, 2000 (detail). Audio generator, light pulse generator, piezo transducer, LED, sugar, plastic container. Courtesy the artist.

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