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Japanese Language Proficiency Test December 2014
Artist talk: Yoshitomo Nara
Talk: Speaking the Same Language - International Collaboration and Co-production in Performing Arts
Public Seminar: WORLD LITERATURE, Japanese perspectives new
Artist talk: Shinro Ohtake
Workshop: Let's Catch the Lion -
Dobutsu Shogi (Animal Shogi) instructed by Madoka Kitao
Public Seminar: Prof AKIRA IRIYE - An Historian Looks at the Contemporary World new
Japan Foundation at Language Show Live 2014
Public Seminar - Maths-As-It-Could-Be: The life and philosophy of Japanese mathematician Kiyoshi Oka new
Talk: Building Blocks: Curating Architecture
Shinjuku Culture in the 1960s -
Talk by Go Hirasawa and Jelena Stojković
new
The Tenth Japanese Speech Contest for University Students new
Japan Group Tour Programme for UK Headteachers
J-Basic Online for Teachers
NOW OPEN! The Japan Webpage Contest for Schools 2014-15
The Japan Foundation & SOAS Language and Culture Course (Beginner Level) - Term 1
Teacher Training: WJEC Japanese Language Units (QCF) new
Book Launch: The Growing Power of Japan, 1967-1972
Botech Compositions: New Work by Macoto Murayama
Yoshitomo Nara: Greetings from a Place in My Heart
Shinro Ohtake
It’s a Wrap: Japanese furoshiki past and present

Japanese Language Proficiency Test December 2014   org

NOW OPEN FOR APPLICATIONS AT BOTH SITES!

The next Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) will take place on Sunday 7th December 2014. It will be held at SOAS, University of London, and the University of Edinburgh.

  • If you wish to take the test at SOAS in London, please click here to apply via the SOAS website. 
  • If you wish to take the test at the University of Edinburgh, please click here to apply via the University of Edinburgh website. 

Online application will be open from mid August 2014 and the deadline is on Thursday 2nd October 2014, or when the test centre has reached its maximum capacity.

For more information about the JLPT, please click here to visit the official JLPT website.


Date: 2 October 2014
Venue:

SOAS University of London and the University of Edinburgh

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Artist talk: Yoshitomo Nara   org

Yoshitomo Nara is one of the most influential and internationally renowned contemporary artists from Japan, best known for his impressionable paintings depicting children and animals. His painterly expression and use of colour are strongly influenced by Western and Japanese modern paintings. That, along with living in a rapidly changing post-war Japan, and being exposed and aware to various cultures – visual arts, literature, and music – that transcend borders, have culminated into forming his current artistic expression. 

On the occasion of his solo exhibition, Greetings from a Place in My Heart, taking place at Dairy Art Centre, London, Nara will speak about his day-to-day creative practice, and what lies at the basis of his expression and artistic sensibility. 

This is a very rare opportunity to gain a further insight into one of Japan’s most legendary artists who seldom makes public appearances, whilst surrounded by his paintings, drawings and sculptures on display.


Date: 3 October 2014 from 7.00pm
Venue:

Dairy Art Centre
7a Wakefield St, London WC1N 1PG


Booking:

This event is free but booking essential. To book your place via the website Eventbrite, please click here.

The exhibition Greetings from a Place in My Heart will be at Dairy Art Centre from 3 October to 7 December 2014.  For more information, please visit: dairyartcentre.org.uk

Images: Left:  Yoshitomo Nara, Can’t wait ’til the Night Comes, 2012, © Yoshitomo Nara. Courtesy Blum & Poe, LA.; Yoshitomo Nara, Wicked Looking, 2012, Photo: Joshua White, © Yoshitomo Nara. Courtesy Blum & Poe, LA. (part). Portrait: © Yoshitomo Nara, Photo: Minami Tsukamoto.

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Talk: Speaking the Same Language - International Collaboration and Co-production in Performing Arts   org

With the increasing number of opportunities available, performing arts professionals have noted the benefits of international collaboration, and this has resulted in a growing number of projects being co-produced, even between the U.K. and Japan. Attributed to many factors, including arguably improved communication technology and the increased pace of globalisation, this established practice is not just about touring a one-off project; through combined efforts by producers and artists, multicultural understanding and artistic development is used to create new works that overcome barriers between nations, languages and companies. But what is the reality of international collaboration/co-production and why has there been a surge of the practice in recent years?

With over 40 years of experience as a producer for contemporary performing arts, Hiroshi Takahagi, Vice Director of the Tokyo Metropolitan Theatre in Japan, will explore issues involved in international collaboration/co-production, in particular works linked with Japan. Illustrating some past examples, Takahagi will also explain the different modes and mechanisms of creating a joint work, and expand on the rewards and challenges of these international activities, as well as what the future holds.

Following Takahagi’s presentation, he will be joined for a discussion with Mark Ball, Artistic Director at LIFT and Michelle Carwardine-Palmer, Managing Director at National Theatre Wales.

This programme will provide hands-on knowledge about the state of international collaboration/co-production and will offer food for thought for anyone who is concerned about the formation of a multicultural performing arts project.


Date: 7 October 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

Japan Foundation, London


Booking:
This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk.

Image credits: Left: The Opportunity of Efficiency, production by National Theatre Wales produced by New National Theatre Tokyo. Right: Shun-kin, production by Complicite, performed at the Barbican Centre, London. Photo by Sarah Ainslie

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Public Seminar: WORLD LITERATURE, Japanese perspectives   org

In recent years, there has been a growing trend to read literary texts as “world literature.” Some Japanese writers and critics welcome this trend as an opportunity to gain a larger readership beyond national and linguistic borders, yet others are wary of it. While these diverse responses today are symptoms of the increasing globalization of cultures, it is also important to take a historical look.

In this public seminar, Dr Shion Kono (Sophia University) will situate the current Japanese debates on world literature in the global circulation and reception of Japanese literature over the past century.  He will also discuss the prospects of Japanese literature as world literature.  Joining Kono to explore these issues further will be Dr Irena Hayter from the University of Leeds. 


Date: 9 October 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk.

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Artist talk: Shinro Ohtake   org

Constantly exploring the act of creating, Shinro Ohtake is a distinguished Japanese contemporary artist whose career spans over 35 years. His work is truly borderless with his main medium being painting but also expands into sculpture, design, installation, and even experimental music.

Ohtake’s subject and complex style has earned him numerous invitations to exhibitions worldwide including dOCUMENTA (13) in 2012, the Venice Biennale in 2013 and this year’s Yokohama Triennale. Additionally, he was recently awarded one of Japan’s most prominent art accolades, The Agency for Cultural Affairs Minister’s Award for the Fine Arts 2013-2014. 

In conjunction with the largest U.K. exhibition of his work at Parasol unit foundation of contemporary art in London, The Japan Foundation has invited Ohtake to explore the characteristics of both his past and recent work, and the unprecedented approach he uses for his own brand of accumulation. In discussion with Mark Rappolt, editor of ArtReview, this talk will also examine the meaning of expression in his interdisciplinary style, reflecting how his approach and characteristics have developed over time in response to the changing worldwide and Japanese art scene


Date: 10 October 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk.

Image: Shinro Ohtake, Scrapbook #66, 2010-2012. Mixed media artist book, 72 x 96 x 129 cm, 27.2 kg, 830 pages. Courtesy of the artist and Take Ninagawa, Tokyo, photo by Kei Okano

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Workshop: Let's Catch the Lion -
Dobutsu Shogi (Animal Shogi) instructed by Madoka Kitao
  org

Shogi is a traditional Japanese board game, similar to Western Chess. Played by two players, the different ways in which the pieces can move arguably makes Shogi strategically more interesting and exciting to play through to the end. However, the downside of Shogi is that it takes some time to master…

In order to encourage those who have always wanted to play Shogi but didn’t know where to start, the Japan Foundation has invited Madoka Kitao, one of Japan’s most distinguished Shogi players to teach you ‘Dobutsu Shogi’ (‘Animal Shogi’), a simplified version of Shogi, invented by Kitao herself.

Having much less pieces on the board, Dobutsu Shogi may seem an easy game at first, but once you experience it, you will soon be drawn into the dazzling labyrinthine world of Shogi. The game is suitable for all ages (as long as you can recognize the animal pictures on the pawns!) and even those who consider themselves a Shogi master will also be fascinated to play this wild variation!

At the beginning of workshop, Madoka Kitao will also talk about the culture and history of Shogi in Japan.

Come and enjoy Dobutsu Shogi and meet the master and inventor of this cute board game!

For ages 8 to 108! (Children under 11 must be accompanied by a responsible adult.)

Workshop Times:

11:00am - 12:30pm (for adults and independent children)
2:00pm - 3:30pm (for families) 

2:00pm - 3:30pm (for families)

Date: 11 October 2014
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


The workshops are free to attend but booking is essential. To register, please email your name and the session you would like to attend to: event@jpf.org.uk

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Public Seminar: Prof AKIRA IRIYE - An Historian Looks at the Contemporary World   org

The Japan Foundation is delighted to present this special public seminar with Professor Akira Iriye, Professor Emeritus, Harvard University and recipient of the Japan Foundation Award 2013.  Drawing on decades of research, Prof Iriye will examine historical study today and international relations history, before discussing the defining characteristics of the contemporary world and offering his thoughts on the future.  Joining Professor Iriye in discussion will be Professor Rana Mitter, Director of the University China Centre at the University of Oxford.


Date: 13 October 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk.

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Japan Foundation at Language Show Live 2014   org

Come and see the Japan Foundation at Language Show Live 2014!

Language Show Live is the UK’s largest language event and the show for those who offer products and services to language teachers, learners, translators, linguists, language professionals and businesses. This year, the Japan Foundation are giving visitors more chances than ever before to learn about Japanese language and culture. Our attractions will include:

The Japan Foundation Information Stand
When:
17th, 18th, 19th October  
Where: Olympia Central, Hammersmith Road, London (Stand no. 709)  
Packed full of information about studying and teaching Japanese in the UK, our stand will be staffed with members of Japan Foundation who would be delighted to give you advice on your Japanese studies. Our stand will also include:

  • A Japan Quiz, with the chance to win a goody bag full of Japan Foundation exclusive gifts
  • A name-writing corner – make your own Japanese name sticker!
  • Free little gifts to take home with you
  • The stand will be shared with JP Books, a supplier of Japanese books including learning resources for Japanese language.

Presentation: “Teaching Primary Languages & Culture through Kami-shibai – Traditional Japanese Storytelling”
When:  Friday 17 October, 16.00 – 16.45
Kami-shibai (“paper drama”) is a traditional form of storytelling in Japan, in which the storyteller uses large pictures to engage the audience and aid their understanding. In this presentation, we will demonstrate how kami-shibai can be used to make the learning of any language fun and effective, in addition to inspiring pupils’ creativity and cultural awareness. The presentation will include examples of how kami-shibai has been used to teach language and other subjects in UK schools, as well as a bilingual kami-shibai performance that we hope all audience members, young and old, can enjoy!

Japanese Language taster
When:  Saturday 18 October, 13.30- 14.00
Experience Japanese language first hand by taking a taster lesson!

Seminar: “Going beyond Europe: A case study of success in teaching Japanese language in a UK School” with Crispin Chambers
When:
Sunday 19th, 11.45 - 12.30
Crispin Chambers, 2013 winner of Pearson Award for Teacher of the Year in a Secondary School, will share his success story of raising enthusiasm and achievement among the students at Tavistock School, by teaching them a more unusual language: Japanese.

Don’t miss out on the UK’s biggest languages event – click here for more information and to book your place (entrance is free if registered in advance)!


Date: 17 October 2014 - 19 October 2014 from 10.18am
Venue:

Olympia Central, London

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Public Seminar - Maths-As-It-Could-Be: The life and philosophy of Japanese mathematician Kiyoshi Oka   org

 

Kiyoshi Oka (1901-1978) was one of the greatest Japanese mathematicians of the 20th century. His contribution to mathematics was such that Carl Siegel mistakenly believed ‘Oka’ to be the name of a group of mathematicians. In Japan, Oka is known not only for his tremendous contribution to maths, but also as a great thinker and philosopher.  His thoughts were shaped through the prisms of the Japanese language and culture and he was greatly influenced by traditional Zen Buddhist philosophy (in particular, that of Dōgen) and Japanese literature such as Matsuo Bashō and Natsume Soseki.  
In this talk, independent scholar Masao Morita, will introduce Oka’s unique philosophy of mathematics, and the Japanese traditional thoughts underlying his ideas.  He will also shed light on Oka’s life and thinking as a mathematician while examining how Oka pursued a "maths as it could be".  Joining Morita in discussion will be Professor Tadashi Tokieda from the University of Cambridge.

Kiyoshi Oka (1901-1978) was one of the greatest Japanese mathematicians of the 20th century. His contribution to mathematics was such that Carl Siegel mistakenly believed ‘Oka’ to be the name of a group of mathematicians. In Japan, Oka is known not only for his tremendous contribution to maths, but also as a great thinker and philosopher.  His thoughts were shaped through the prisms of the Japanese language and culture and he was greatly influenced by traditional Zen Buddhist philosophy (in particular, that of Dōgen) and Japanese literature such as Matsuo Bashō and Natsume Soseki.  


In this public seminar, independent scholar Masao Morita, will introduce Oka’s unique philosophy of mathematics and the Japanese traditional thoughts underlying his ideas.  He will also shed light on Oka’s life and thinking as a mathematician while examining how Oka pursued a "maths as it could be".  Joining Morita in discussion will be Professor Tadashi Tokieda from the University of Cambridge.


Date: 17 October 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk.

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Talk: Building Blocks: Curating Architecture   org

Despite the complexity and difficult curatorial challenge in exhibiting architecture as a medium, a number of such exhibitions have been held in a variety of settings. Often involving installations, sketches, photos and models, we are able to gain an insight into the minds, worlds and inspirations of architects and the environments they create, but what can be truly understood about architecture through such exhibitions?

Contemplating this question, the Japan Foundation has invited Kayoko Ota, a curator and editor specialising in architecture, to discuss the purpose of architecture exhibitions and how this format can help foster our understanding. Having been the commissioner for this year’s Japan Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale and with long and established career overseas, Ota will draw on her global experience to explore various issues involved in curating architecture exhibitions both on a practical and theoretical level, while looking into what aspects in Japanese architecture have been and can be examined keeping its history, characteristics and current state in mind.

Following Kayoko Ota's presentation, she will be joined for a discussion by Catherine Ince, Curator at Barbican Art Gallery.

Booking:
This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk.


Date: 20 October 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

Japan Foundation, London


Image credits: Clockwise from top left: Overview of the exhibition at the Japan Pavilion 2014, "In the Real World", Photo by Keigo Kobayashi; Entrance to the Japan Pavilion 2014, "In the Real World", Photo by Keigo Kobayashi;  Digital installation "Blurring Architecture" as part of Toyo Ito's exhibition "Vision and Reality" at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2000

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Shinjuku Culture in the 1960s -
Talk by Go Hirasawa and Jelena Stojković
  org

The 1960s marks a crucial turning point culturally, socially and politically. When it comes to Japan, there were lots of countercultural activities at the time in the town of Shinjuku in Tokyo. This emblematic site was a hotbed of avant-garde art, involving such artists as Nagisa Oshima, Daido Moriyama and Shuji Terayama, to name but a few.

Reflecting the current resurgence of attention towards the arts and social expression of the 1960s, as well as the attempts at their critical evaluation, this talk event will explore how the town of Shinjuku played a significant role in the birth of the new wave movement, and why it still influences and interests us today.

Go Hirasawa, researcher at Meiji Gakuin University who specialises in political cinema, will delve into the various new activities that were created for and taking place both inside and outside of the various cultural venues in Shinjuku, and will analyse the artistic expression that was produced within such a chaotic urban space in the 1960s.

Jelena Stojković, an art historian, writer and curator based in London, will examine the role of photography in 1960s Japan while introducing some of the photographic projects that evolved from the vibrant Shinjuku cultural 'scene' at that time.  She will also discuss the chief practitioners, their main subjects of interest and a wide range of images that they produced.

Presenting the new cultural forms, within and across disciplines, which emerged from Shinjuku, this talk will discuss the relationship between the town, art and the expression of creativity in the 1960s in Japan.


Date: 27 October 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk.

Images: Left: Ecstasy of the Angels, 1972, Dir. Koji Wakamatsu. Right: Diary of a Shinjuku Thief, 1969, Dir. Nagisa Oshima.

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The Tenth Japanese Speech Contest for University Students   org

We are delighted to announce that the 10th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students will soon be open for applications!

This contest gives students the chance to make their voices heard in Japanese, and win some fantastic prizes including a return air ticket to Japan! Finalists will all perform their speeches on Saturday 28th February 2015 at Regent’s University London

:: Contest Aims
The main purpose of the event is to improve the speaking and presentation skills of students studying Japanese as a foreign language. Through this event, we hope to promote Japanese language learning at higher education level in the UK and Ireland. The contest is organised by the British Association for Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language (BATJ) and the Japan Foundation, London.

:: Who can apply?
The contest is aimed at undergraduate students who are currently studying Japanese as a foreign language at a university in the UK or Ireland. Postgraduate students are not eligible. Candidates with Japanese parents are welcome to apply. Please see the files below for full eligibility criteria. Please note that First Prize winners from previous years will not be able to enter the same category again this year.There are three different categories:

  • Speech Category: Students take part in this category as individuals, and are free to choose their speech topic. The Speech Category is for those who are studying Japanese as either a degree or non-degree course at a including an elective, optional or other university-based language course.
  • Individual Presentation Category: Students take part in this category as individuals. The Individual Presentation Category is aimed at those studying Japanese at post beginner level. Participants will give a PowerPoint presentation using Japanese. The aim of the presentation is to introduce a particular theme to the audience, for example a region, event, custom, etc. from the UK or another country outside Japan.
  • Group Presentation Category: Aimed at those studying Japanese at beginner level. Participants will take part in groups of two to four students and give a PowerPoint presentation using Japanese. The aim of the presentation is to introduce a particular theme to the audience, for example a region, event, custom, etc. from the UK or another country outside Japan. All groups which are selected to present during the finals day will be given a special award.

:: Prizes
Just some of the fantastic prizes awarded at this contest include a digital camera, a PC, and a return air ticket to Japan plus a Japan Rail Pass! Download the contest flyer below for full details on the prizes

:: Application Deadlines:

Speech Category: 11th November 2014

Individual and Group Presentation Categories: 25th November 2014

Open for applications soon!


Date: 25 September 2014 - 25 November 2014
Venue:

Regent's University London

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Japan Group Tour Programme for UK Headteachers   org

As part of the Japan Foundation’s Primary Japanese Campaign to support and encourage primary schools teaching Japanese language, we will be giving 20 head teachers the opportunity to take a study trip to Japan at the end of October 2014 on the Japan Group Tour Programme for UK Head Teachers.

The programme will include Japanese cultural experiences to help deepen your understanding of Japan, as well as a visit to a Japanese school to observe the Japanese education system first-hand. It will also provide an excellent opportunity to network with teachers in Japan, as well as with other head teachers in the UK whose schools are enthusiastic about Japanese. The Japan Foundation will cover all travel, accommodation and meal expenses.

*Registration for this programme has now closed.* 

Priority will be given to head teachers based at primary schools that are teaching, or planning to teach, Japanese language within the curriculum.

 

Tentative Itinerary (to be confirmed...)
25th Oct (Saturday)
Afternoon: Pre-departure session over lunch at the Japan Foundation London
Evening: Flight to Tokyo
26th Oct (Sunday)
Arrival in Tokyo – No scheduled events so you can rest and avoid jetlag. 
27th Oct (Monday)
- Introductory session at the Japan Foundation Head Office
- Visit Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs
28th Oct (Tuesday)
- Visit Elementary School in Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo
- Visiting British Chamber of Commerce in Japan
29th Oct (Wednesday)
- Go to Kyoto via Shin-kansen (Bullet train) 
- Cultural experience (Visiting old shrines and temples)
- Group Dinner at a traditional Japanese restaurant
30th Oct (Thursday)
- Elementary School visit in Kyoto
- Return to Tokyo
31st Oct (Friday)
- Morning: free time
- From 15:00 Wrap-up session at the Japan Foundation
- Farewell reception hosted by the Executive Vice President, Japan Foundation
1st Nov (Saturday)
Flight back to London Heathrow. We will arrive in the afternoon. 

Tentative Itinerary (to be confirmed...)

25th Oct (Saturday)
- 12:00: Pre-departure session over lunch at the Japan Foundation London
- Evening: Flight to Tokyo
26th Oct (Sunday)
- Arrival in Tokyo – No scheduled events so you can rest and avoid jetlag. 
27th Oct (Monday)
- 10:00 Introductory session at the Japan Foundation Head Office
- 14:00 Visit Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs
28th Oct (Tuesday)
- 10:00 Visit Elementary School in Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo
- 14:00 Visit British Chamber of Commerce in Japan
29th Oct (Wednesday)
- 8:30 Go to Kyoto via Shin-kansen (Bullet train) 
- Cultural experience (Visiting old shrines and temples)
- Group Dinner at a traditional Japanese restaurant
30th Oct (Thursday)
- Elementary School visit in Kyoto
- Return to Tokyo in the afternoon
31st Oct (Friday)
- Morning: free time
- 15:00 Wrap-up session at the Japan Foundation
- 18:00 Farewell reception hosted by the Executive Vice President, Japan Foundation
1st Nov (Saturday)
- Flight back to London Heathrow. We will arrive in the afternoon. 


Date: 25 October 2014 - 1 November 2014

*Registration for this programme has now closed.* 

   

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J-Basic Online for Teachers   org

This online course is for teachers with a basic level of Japanese who would like to build up their language skills. Through the course, you will develop a basic working knowledge of Japanese grammatical structures and build up your confidence and skills in using Japanese effectively in your classroom.  This course is provided by the Japan Foundation Sydney.

Course fee: approx. £75 - £120 (Depending on language level and exchange rate)

Who can sign up?
Any teacher residing in the UK, Australia or New Zealand who has a basic knowledge of Japanese, and can read hiragana and katakana.

What level of Japanese is it suitable for?
Four stages are available. We recommend you take the “level check test” to make sure you choose the best level for you. Stage 1 (the easiest) is suitable for those who know hiragana and katakana.  Stage 4 (the hardest) is about the same level as N5 (old Level 4) of the JLPT.

How does the course work?
Every week a new unit is uploaded. You will work through the unit at your own pace, and then complete your homework by the end of each week. Your homework will be marked and returned to you with helpful advice and comments from our Japanese Language Advisor. 

Feedback from previous participants:

“I have really enjoyed it, the course content is useful as covers all areas of the Japanese language i.e. speaking, listening, reading, writing – lots of writing practice which is a challenge but good practice!”

“I really, really like the Production task, especially as you get some prompt feedback from the Language Advisor. Brilliant!”

Remaining 2014-15 Dates 

  • Session 4: 28 July – 19 September
  • Session 5: 21 September – 14 November
  • Holiday Session: 24 November – 23 January 2015.
Session 1: 3 February – 28 March 2014
Session 2: 31 March – 23 May 2014
Session 3: 26 May – 18 July 2014
Session 4: 21 July – 12 September 2014
Session 5: 15 September– 7 November 2014

Session 6: 24 November 2014 -23 January 2015

 

 For more information and to enrol, please go to http://www.jpf.org.au/jbasic


Date: 3 February 2014 - 23 January 2015
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NOW OPEN! The Japan Webpage Contest for Schools 2014-15   org

The Japan Webpage Contest for Schools will be running again in 2014-15, and is now open for applications!

We know that many schools are teaching Japanese or doing other projects about Japan, and we want to hear more about it.

This contest is open to any UK school that is teaching Japanese or doing any kind of project related to Japan. Your school does not need to be teaching Japanese to enter the contest.

To enter the contest, all you need to do is make a simple webpage about the work that your school is doing with Japanese or Japan. This could be a blog, a wiki, or a page that's part of your school's website.

The tentative schedule for the webpage contest is as follows:

  • Deadline to enter the contest January 12th 2015
  • Short-listed schools announced Mid January 2015 
  • Online public voting February 2015
  • Announcement of contest winners Monday 2nd March 2015
  • Presentation Evening and Award Ceremony March 2015

NOW OPEN FOR APPLICATIONS! For details on how to apply please visit the official Japan Webpage Contest for Schools website at www.japanwebpagecontest.org.uk . It's also full of tips, hints and entries from previous contests.

To subscribe for updates about the contest, please submit a “Register Your Interest” form here. By registering your interest, you will be the first to know about all the updates and latest information about the contest. 


Date: 15 May 2014 - 31 March 2015
Download JWCS14-Flyer2sides(lowres)

This contest is supported by the Association for Language Learning (ALL), the British Council, the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation, and the Japan Society.

 

                

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The Japan Foundation & SOAS Language and Culture Course (Beginner Level) - Term 1   org

Our popular Japanese language & culture course returns for 2014-15!

The Japan Foundation & SOAS Language and Culture Course (Beginner Level) is a new kind of course for absolute beginners (JF Standard for Japanese Language Education A1 Breakthrough) of Japanese. It is based on the JF Standard for Japanese Language Education, rather than traditional methods of language education that focus on grammar and sentence structure. The aim of the course will be to use Japanese language skills to get to know people, visit restaurants and take part in many other Japan-related events. At the end of every lesson, participants will be able to perform specific, practical tasks in Japanese.

The course will not focus on language alone; learning Japanese culture will also be an important element in the lessons. The course will incorporate videos, games and media that will help you to learn about Japan and to give you the opportunity to use your new Japanese skills outside of the classroom. You will also have access to the supplementary MARUGOTO+ Japanese Learning website. Participants of this course will even be eligible for temporary full membership of the Japan Foundation London Library for the duration of the term they are enrolled in and will be able to borrow resources from its collection of approx. 10,000 Japanese language education textbooks and other learning materials. This course is perfect for absolute beginners of Japanese who would like to use their new language skills in practical situations and really connect with Japanese society.

  • Term 1 Dates: 9th October 2014 – 11th December 2014 (every Thursday)19:00 - 21:00
  • Course Leader: Mr Shinichiro Okajima, SOAS Language Centre
  • Venue: SOAS, University of London 
  • Course Fee: £330 per term, including course textbook and materials 

I liked the pace of the course and was surprised we learned hiragana and katakana [Japanese writing] so quickly. As it was an introductory course, I felt the balance was right for people who were complete beginners  and self-studying students like myself who had a little bit of language under my belt already. I certainly feel, after learning about ordering food, that I would be able to do this in Japan.” - JP Rutter, former course participant.

For more information to book your place please click here to visit the SOAS website.

For full information about the course timetable, future term dates etc. please download the flier below.


Date: 9 October 2014 - 11 December 2014 from 7.00pm
Venue:

Download JpLangCult 2014-2015
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Teacher Training: WJEC Japanese Language Units (QCF)   JPsupported
Enhance your Japanese language lessons by giving your pupils the opportunity to gain formal recognition for their learning. The WJEC Language Units are small bite-sized qualifications which enable learners to demonstrate their competence and progress by producing evidence in the classroom. 
The Benefits :
Internally assessed by you in the classroom.
Each qualification requires approximately 10 hours to deliver and complete. (20 hours for written Japanese)
Ideal for building confidence – pupils can gain recognition in a positive “can-do” setting at a pace to suit them.
Flexibility to adapt the context and focus of the evidence to fit in with your curriculum.
Can be offered in lunchtime and afterschool Japanese clubs.
Enhances the foreign language teaching in primary schools.   
This workshop will be held in Japanese and English.

Enhance your Japanese language lessons by giving your pupils the opportunity to gain formal recognition for their learning. The WJEC Language Units are small bite-sized qualifications which enable learners to demonstrate their competence and progress by producing evidence in the classroom. 

The Benefits :

  • Internally assessed by you in the classroom.
  • Each qualification requires approximately 10 hours to deliver and complete. (20 hours for written Japanese)
  • Ideal for building confidence – pupils can gain recognition in a positive “can-do” setting at a pace to suit them.
  • Flexibility to adapt the context and focus of the evidence to fit in with your curriculum.
  • Can be offered in lunchtime and afterschool Japanese clubs.
  • Enhances the foreign language teaching in primary schools.   

This workshop will be held in Japanese and English.

Schedule:
10.00   Arrival and Refreshments
10.30   Welcome & Introductions
             Japanese Language Teaching in the UK and support available from the Japan Foundation
11.00   Introduction to WJEC’s QCF Qualification in Japanese
12.30   Lunch and Networking
13.30   Continue Main training session and introduce free resources  
16:45   Final Questions, Summary, Evaluation Sheet
17:00 Close
For forthcoming FREE CPD sessions in other areas of the UK, please see WJEC Website Language Units CPD Sessions or contact Claire Parry Claire.parry@wjec.co.uk

Schedule:
- 10.00   Arrival and Refreshments
- 10.30   Welcome & Introductions           
      Japanese Language Teaching in the UK and support available from the Japan Foundation
- 11.00   Introduction to WJEC’s QCF Qualification in Japanese
- 12.30   Lunch and Networking
- 13.30   Continue Main training session and introduce free resources  
- 16:45   Final Questions, Summary, Evaluation Sheet
- 17:00   Close

To register for this event, please click here

Schedule:
10.00   Arrival and Refreshments
10.30   Welcome & Introductions
             Japanese Language Teaching in the UK and support available from the Japan Foundation
11.00   Introduction to WJEC’s QCF Qualification in Japanese
12.30   Lunch and Networking
13.30   Continue Main training session and introduce free resources  
16:45   Final Questions, Summary, Evaluation Sheet
17:00 Close
For forthcoming FREE CPD sessions in other areas of the UK, please see WJEC Website Language Units CPD Sessions or contact Claire Parry Claire.parry@wjec.co.uk

Date: 22 October 2014
Venue:

Japan Foundation, London


To register for this event, please click here

For forthcoming FREE CPD sessions in other areas of the UK, please see WJEC Website Language Units CPD Sessions or contact Claire Parry Claire.parry@wjec.co.uk

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Book Launch: The Growing Power of Japan, 1967-1972   JPsupported

The Japan Foundation is delighted to host the launch of The Growing Power of Japan, 1967-1972: analysis and assessments from John Pilcher and the British Embassy, Tokyo, compiled and edited by Sir Hugh Cortazzi. The publishers, Renaissance Books in association with the Japan Society, would like to thank the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation, Julia Bonas and others for their generous help towards the costs of publication.

In this volume Sir Hugh has compiled the defining reports from Sir John Pilcher’s time as ambassador to Japan from 1967 to ’72, a period in which Japan’s economy and power grew significantly and her relations with the United States became increasingly strained. Sir Hugh, who worked with Pilcher during these years and was himself Ambassador to Japan from 1980 to ’84, will open the launch with an overview of the changing character of Anglo-Japanese relations and of the first overseas visit by a Japanese Emperor. This will be followed by an open discussion led by Chairman of the Japan Society, Sir David Warren, and a drinks reception. We are delighted to announce that all attendees will receive copies of the book.

This collection of Pilcher’s reports to Whitehall provides a valuable record of Japan’s progress at this turning point in her post-war history, as well as insights into the hopes and expectations of the British Government in her dealings with Japan. Pilcher’s role during this period was that of bridge-builder between the two countries following the post-war decades of disenchantment and distrust.

Pilcher’s reports were not only unusually comprehensive but were characterised by his natural sympathy for the country and deep knowledge of its culture and religion. His writings on Japan have remained largely inaccessible, and unknown to most researchers, and The Growing Power of Japan offers readers a unique insight into the thoughts of this distinguished scholar-diplomat.


Date: 6 October 2014 from 6.45pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


Booking:

This event is organised by the Japan Society.  To reserve your place please contact the Japan Society office on 020 3075 1996 or email events@japansociety.org.uk or submit the online booking form.

 

Organised by:

Supported by:

   

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Botech Compositions: New Work by Macoto Murayama   JPsupported

For the 2014 Liverpool Biennial, Metal will be exhibiting the work of Macoto Murayama. Based in Tokyo, Murayama spent six months of 2013 living and working at Metal’s space in Southend on Sea, dissecting, recording and rendering in digital form UK indigenous flowers. The resulting works are presented at Metal’s Liverpool base, Edge Hill Station as a series of high definition, animated sequences that reveals the beauty, fragility and architectural structure of flowers. It is the first time that Macoto Murayama’s work has been exhibited in the UK.


Date: 4 July 2014 - 26 October 2014
Venue:

Metal, Edge Hill Station, Liverpool


For more information, please click here.
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Yoshitomo Nara: Greetings from a Place in My Heart   JPsupported

Dairy Art Centre, London, will present a major solo exhibition by Japanese artist Yoshitomo Nara. The exhibition will be the largest and most comprehensive in the UK to date, and will feature seminal pieces by the artist, many of which have never been shown before in the UK. Comprising a large body of recent and previously unreleased works, the exhibition will include painting, sculpture and a unique retrospective of Nara’s drawings spanning 30 years.


Date: 3 October 2014 - 7 December 2014
Venue:

Dairy Art Centre, London


For more information, please click here.
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Shinro Ohtake   JPsupported

Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art will present a solo exhibition devoted to the work of Japanese artist Shinro Ohtake. The exhibition is Ohtake’s first major show in a public London institution and provides an important exposure of Ohtake’s early, recent and new works. It focuses particularly on his ‘Retina’ and ‘Time Memory’ series, but also includes works from the ‘Frost’ and ‘Cell’ series. Several of Ohtake’s films, another integral part of his practice, will also be screened during the exhibition.


Date: 12 October 2014 - 12 December 2014
Venue:

Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London


For more information, please click here.

Image: Shinro Ohtake, 'Time Memory 28' (detail), 2014. 220.5 x 300.5 x 10.5 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Take Ninagawa, Tokyo

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It’s a Wrap: Japanese furoshiki past and present   JPsupported

The Rugby Art Gallery and Museum presents a new large scale exhibition focusing on furoshiki, a square shaped piece of cloth used for wrapping and carry different types of merchandise or gifts. Featuring loans of textiles from museum collections in the UK and pieces not seen in the UK before from collections in Japan, the exhibition explores the cultural significance and origins of furoshiki, as well as its application today as an eco-friendly alternative to plastic bags and expensive gift wrapping.


Date: 20 September 2014 - 10 January 2015
Venue:

Rugby Art Gallery and Museum


For more information, please click here.

Image credit: Cotton material, indigo dyed Shindigo shibori, 900 x 900. 2007. Commissioned by Brighton Museum & Art Gallery from HIROYUKI Shindo © Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove

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