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Training Programme for Teachers of Japanese in Europe in Alsace new
Book Launch & Talk: The Youth of Things - Stephen Dodd in Conversation with Linda Flores
Rebuilding Together - The Ishinomaki Children’s Newspaper Translation Project 2014 new
Post 3.11 - What Can Art Do?
Case 3 - Listening to the Voices from Tohoku - Artists or Archivists?
new
Learn & Teach Primary Japanese! new
Japanese Taster for Schools (JTS) Programme – June 2014 Training Day for Volunteers
Special Free Film Screening: Drops of Heaven
J-Basic Online for Teachers
SAVE THE DATE! 2014 Refresher Course for Teachers of Japanese!
LIFT 2014: Toshiki Okada’s Super Premium Soft Double Vanilla Rich

Training Programme for Teachers of Japanese in Europe in Alsace   org

The Japan Foundation in Paris (MCJP) and the Site du Centre europen d'tudes japonaises d'Alsace (CEEJA or 欧州日本学研究所) will hold a joint training programme to enhance the network of teachers and to improve the Japanese language teaching skills of participants.

You can download the application form and information for this year’s course on our courses page here, find out more and download the application from Japan Foundation in Paris website here

Details about the Training Programme:
Dates: Monday 7th July 2014 Friday 11th July 2014 (participants arrive on 6th July 2014)
Location: Centre Europen d'Etudes Japonaises d'Alsace (CEEJA) in Alsace, France
Theme: Understanding with “Marugoto” building competencies in accomplishing tasks and intercultural understanding – from lesson plans to course design
Attendees: 20 places available to teachers of Japanese from anywhere in Europe. 

Please note that this course is held completely in Japanese, so you need a high level of Japanese (at least JLPT N2 level.)

Applications should be sent to 2014alsace@gmail.com at Japan Foundation in Paris
Deadline: Sunday 4th May 2014

*Marugoto is the new text book from the Japan Foundation that is designed to teach Japanese by accomplishing tasks using their language skills alongside learning competence in intercultural understanding. 


Date: 4 May 2014
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Book Launch & Talk: The Youth of Things - Stephen Dodd in Conversation with Linda Flores   org

Dr. Stephen Dodd's new book, The Youth of Things: Life and Death in the Age of Kajii Motojirô, explores the startlingly beautiful and poetic short stories of Kajii Motojirô, a short-lived writer of the late Taishô/early Shôwa period who has been relatively unexplored until now.  His book also aims to place the stories within the wider social and cultural context of the times.  At this special launch event, Dr Dodd will join with Dr. Linda Flores (University of Oxford) in discussing the issues relating to Kajii and the broader context.


Date: 7 May 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please email your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk

 

Book Synopsis:

When he died from tuberculosis at the age of thirty-one, Kajii Motojirō had written only twenty short stories. Yet his life and work, it is argued here, sheds light on a significant moment in Japanese history and, ultimately, adds to our understanding of how modern Japanese identity developed. By the time Kajii began to write in the mid-1920s there was heated debate among his peers over “legitimate” forms of literary expression: Japanese Romantics questioned the value of a western-inspired version of modernity; others were influenced by Marxist proletarian literature or modernist experimentation; still others tried to create a distinctly Japanese fictional style that concentrated on first-person perspective, the so-called “I-novel.” There was a general sense that Japan needed to reinvent itself, but writers and artists were at odds over what form this reinvention should take. Throughout his career, Kajii drew from these various camps but belonged to none of them, making his work an invaluable indicator of a culture in crisis and transition.

The Youth of Things is the first full-length book devoted to Kajii Motojirō. It brings together English translations of nearly all his completed stories with an analysis of his literature in the context of several major themes that locate him in 1920s Japan. In particular, Dodd links the writer’s work with the physical body: Kajii’s subjective literary presence was grounded first and foremost in his TB-stricken physical body, hence one cannot be studied without the other. His concerns with health and mortality drove him to play a central role in constructing a language for modern literature and to offer new insights into ideas that intrigued so many other Taishō intellectuals and writers. In addition, Kajii’s early years as a writer were strongly influenced by the cosmopolitan humanism of the White Birch (Shirakaba) school, but by the time his final work was published in the early 1930s, an environment of greater cultural introspection was beginning to take root, encapsulated in the expression “return to Japan” (nihon kaiki). Only a few years separate these two moments in time, but they represent a profound shift in the aspirations and expectations of a whole generation of writers. Through a study of Kajii’s writing, this book offers some sense of the demise of one cultural moment and the creation of another.

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Rebuilding Together - The Ishinomaki Children’s Newspaper Translation Project 2014   org

Join in the effort to rebuild life in Ishinomaki by volunteering your translation skills...
Ishinomaki is a city in Japan’s Miyagi Prefecture, and is one of the areas that suffered severe damage due to the Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Exactly one year later, the children of Ishinomaki published Ishinomaki Hibi Kodomo Shinbun; a newspaper created by the children that reports the current activities in their city. In March 2013, for the third anniversary of the disaster, the children told Ishinomaki’s story to people all over the world – by translating selected articles into English, with the help of UK-based volunteers who speak both Japanese and English. The project was so successful that it is running again this May!
We are looking for individuals who can help to translate  Ishinomaki Hibi Kodomo Shinbun from Japanese into English. We particularly encourage intermediate and advanced-level Japanese language learners. On May 10th 2014, we are holding a workshop where volunteers will be able to speak directly to the people of Ishinomaki via the internet, which will give you the opportunity to learn more about how Ishinomaki was affected by the March 11 disaster, its current effort towards recovery, and the activities of the young journalists themselves. Your translation of the newspaper will be published online, so that readers worldwide can learn about Ishinomaki and its progress.  This is a real opportunity for you to use your language skills to make a difference.

Join in the effort to rebuild life in Ishinomaki by volunteering your translation skills...

Ishinomaki is a city in Japan’s Miyagi Prefecture, and is one of the areas that suffered severe damage due to the Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Exactly one year later, the children of Ishinomaki published Ishinomaki Hibi Kodomo Shinbun; a newspaper created by the children that reports the current activities in their city. In March 2013, for the third anniversary of the disaster, the children told Ishinomaki’s story to people all over the world – by translating selected articles into English, with the help of UK-based volunteers who speak both Japanese and English (the results can be seen here). The project was so successful that it is running again this May!

We are looking for individuals who can help to translate  Ishinomaki Hibi Kodomo Shinbun from Japanese into English. We particularly encourage intermediate and advanced-level Japanese language learners. On May 10th 2014, we are holding a workshop where volunteers will be able to speak directly to the people of Ishinomaki via the internet, which will give you the opportunity to learn more about how Ishinomaki was affected by the March 11 disaster, its current effort towards recovery, and the activities of the young journalists themselves. Your translation of the newspaper will be published online, so that readers worldwide can learn about Ishinomaki and its progress.  

This is a real opportunity for you to use your language skills to make a difference.

Timetable:

  • 09:45 – 10:00: Reception desk open
  • 10:00 – 10:10: Welcome & Introduction with Michiko Ota (Representative of Kids Media Station)
  • 10:10 – 10:50: Talk: Ishinomaki to shinsai – sono ato 
  • 10:50 – 11:20: Introduction to Ishinomaki Hibi Kodomo Shinbun plus Q&A
  • 11:20 – 11:30: Break
  • 11:30 – 13:00: Translation and draft submission
Japanese Level: Intermediate – Advanced learners (approx. JLPT N3 and above); this workshop will be held in Japanese.
Participation fee: Free, but prior booking essential
Last year’s participants are very welcome to book a place this year too!
For more information about the project, please visit: http://kodomokisha.net/kodomoshinbun/index.html

Japanese Level: Intermediate – Advanced learners (approx. JLPT N3 and above); this workshop will be held in Japanese.

Participation fee: Free, but prior booking essential. Last year’s participants are very welcome to book a place this year too!

Click here to read a report from last year's Ishinomaki event

Deadline to Apply: April 30th  
(As we will send out preparation materials in advance, we strongly encourage early bookings!)

Click here to book your place

(This booking form uses Google Drive and is subject to Google's Terms & Conditions. Alternatively, you may book a place by downloading and submitting the booking form below)


Date: 10 May 2014 from 10.00am
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London

Download Ishinomaki2014-Flyer

 With thanks to Ishinomaki Hibi Shinbun Press 

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Post 3.11 - What Can Art Do?
Case 3 - Listening to the Voices from Tohoku - Artists or Archivists?
  org

Post 3.11 is a series of talks with individuals who through art have been involved in various ways in supporting the victims of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in the Tohoku region of Japan. Showcasing their activities, this series aims to examine how the role of the artist and art activities can be vital in such unprecedented situations, in spreading awareness and helping restore confidence among those affected, fundamentally questioning whether art has to have a practical social function. 
For this third session and to commemorate the third anniversary of the disaster of March 2011, the Japan Foundation has invited emerging artist duo Haruka Komori and Natsumi Seo, who moved to the Tohoku area immediately after the disaster and have since been working with the local people. Starting off with recording their observations on their online blog, Komori and Seo have been providing a voice for those who suffered, transforming the people's experiences into artworks.
Considering the role of artists in such unparalleled situations, Komori and Seo will discuss the aim of their practice and how their art can help those in the disaster stricken areas. In a discussion to follow, Komori and Seo will be joined by Meryl Doney, freelance curator and former director of Wallspace Gallery, London, and Mark Dean, an artist who includes archive footage to create his own works, to discuss the different ways artists can use the archive in their practice, and how these approaches can deliver their artistic intentions and stories, looking beyond art as an aesthetic.

Post 3.11 is a series of talks with individuals who through art have been involved in various ways in supporting the victims of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in the Tohoku region of Japan. Showcasing their activities, this series aims to examine how the role of the artist and art activities can be vital in such unprecedented situations, in spreading awareness and helping restore confidence among those affected, fundamentally questioning whether art has to have a practical social function.

For this third session and to commemorate the third anniversary of the disaster of March 2011, the Japan Foundation has invited emerging artist duo Haruka Komori and Natsumi Seo, who moved to the Tohoku area immediately after the disaster and have since been working with the local people. Starting off with recording their observations on their online blog, Komori and Seo have been providing a voice for those who suffered, transforming the people's experiences into artworks.

Considering the role of artists in such unparalleled situations, Komori and Seo will discuss the aim of their practice and how their art can help those in the disaster stricken areas. In a discussion to follow, Komori and Seo will be joined by Meryl Doney, freelance curator and former director of Wallspace Gallery, London, and Mark Dean, an artist who includes archive footage to create his own works, to discuss the different ways artists can use the archive in their practice, and how these approaches can deliver their artistic intentions and stories, looking beyond art as an aesthetic.


Date: 23 May 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk

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Learn & Teach Primary Japanese!   org

Discover how to teach Japanese language to primary level pupils...through learning Japanese yourself!
From September 2014 it will be compulsory for all maintained primary schools in England to teach at least one foreign language from Key Stage 2.  In response to this, the Japan Foundation London is planning a series of workshops and events to help prepare primary teachers who would like to teach Japanese.
In this free, two day course, primary school teachers with little or no prior knowledge of Japanese will have the opportunity not only to learn the basics of Japanese language and culture, but also how to impart their new knowledge on to their pupils. The course will follow the Japan Foundation Japanese Scheme of Work for Primary Schools, which is packed full of lesson plans, resources and exciting and fun ideas for teaching primary-level Japanese. Participants will additionally have access to exclusive draft versions of primary resources that are currently in development at the Japan Foundation. We will also give advice on funding, resources and other assistance available to get Japanese classes up and running at your school.

Discover how to teach Japanese language to primary level pupils...through learning Japanese yourself!

From September 2014 it will be compulsory for all maintained primary schools in England to teach at least one foreign language from Key Stage 2.  In response to this, the Japan Foundation London is planning a series of workshops and events to help prepare primary teachers who would like to teach Japanese.

In this free, two day course, primary school teachers with little or no prior knowledge of Japanese will have the opportunity not only to learn the basics of Japanese language and culture, but also how to impart their new knowledge on to their pupils. The course will follow the Japan Foundation Japanese Scheme of Work for Primary Schools, which is packed full of lesson plans, resources and exciting and fun ideas for teaching primary-level Japanese. Participants will additionally have access to exclusive draft versions of primary resources that are currently in development at the Japan Foundation. We will also give advice on funding, resources and other assistance available to get Japanese classes up and running at your school.

Click here to book your place
(This booking form uses Google Drive and is subject to Google's Terms & Conditions. Alternatively, you may book a place by downloading and submitting the booking form below) 
Timetable (provisional and subject to change):
27th May (Tuesday)
10:30 – 11:40   Orientation, exchange greetings & self-introduction
11:40 – 11:50   Break
11:50 – 13:00    Japanese numbers & game
13:00 – 14:20   Lunch (please bring your own), time to visit the Japan Foundation Library
14:20 – 14:50   Introduction to support from Japan Foundation
14:50  - 16:00  Body parts in Japanese

Timetable (provisional and subject to change):

27th May (Tuesday)

  • 10:30 – 11:40   Orientation, exchange greetings & self-introduction
  • 11:40 – 11:50   Break
  • 11:50 – 13:00    Japanese numbers & game
  • 13:00 – 14:20   Lunch (please bring your own), time to visit the Japan Foundation Library
  • 14:20 – 14:50   Introduction to support from Japan Foundation
  • 14:50  - 16:00  Body parts in Japanese
28th May (Wednesday)
10:30 – 11:40   Japanese pronunciation & writing system
11:40 – 11:50   Break
11:50 – 13:00    Writing names in Japanese
13:00 – 14:20   Lunch (please bring your own), time to visit the Japan Foundation Library
14:20 – 15:30   Colours in Japanese
15:30  - 16:00  Closing

28th May (Wednesday)

  • 10:30 – 11:40   Japanese pronunciation & writing system
  • 11:40 – 11:50   Break
  • 11:50 – 13:00    Writing names in Japanese
  • 13:00 – 14:20   Lunch (please bring your own), time to visit the Japan Foundation Library
  • 14:20 – 15:30   Colours in Japanese
  • 15:30  - 16:00  Closing
This course is for teachers with absolute beginner level, or those who have only studied a little Japanese
Spaces on this course are limited. Priority will be given to teachers or trainee teachers employed by a primary school. 

This course is for teachers with absolute beginner level, or those who have only studied a little Japanese. Spaces on this course are limited. Priority will be given to teachers or trainee teachers employed by a UK primary school. This course is free, but prior booking is essential.

Click here to book your place

(This booking form uses Google Drive and is subject to Google's Terms & Conditions. Alternatively, you may book a place by downloading and submitting the booking form below) 


Date: 27 May 2014 - 28 May 2014 from 10.30am
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London

Download 2014 Basic Course Flyer
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Japanese Taster for Schools (JTS) Programme – June 2014 Training Day for Volunteers   org

The next Volunteer Training Day for our Japanese Taster for Schools (JTS) Programme will take place on Thursday, June 26th 2014.

Our regular Training Days at our London office are a great opportunity to meet other volunteers, get teaching ideas, and ask any questions you may have.  We ask our volunteers who live within travelling distance to London to attend at least one Training Day before making a school visit), in order to get a full understanding of the JTS Programme.  Those who are not yet members of JTS but are interested in joining are also welcome to sign up for the training day.  You can read about our last London Training Day, held in February 2014, here.

Provisional Timetable: The day will begin with an induction for new attendees at 12:30 (registration starts from 12:15). Those who have been to a JTS Training Day before may attend from 13:00. 

How to apply

To register, please click here to use our online application form.

The registration form uses Google Documents and is subject to Google's standard terms and conditions of use. If you would prefer to register in a different way or have difficulty in accessing the form, please email us at info.language@jpf.org.uk and we will send you a Word/ PDF application form.

If you are not yet a member of JTS, please click here for more information about the programme and to complete a membership application form.

The deadline for applications is Tuesday, June 24th. Please note that this is event is free, but prior booking for this event is essential for all attendees. 

For more information about the JTS programme, please click here.

Click here to apply for our June 2014 (London) Training Day


Date: 26 June 2014 from 12.10pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London

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Special Free Film Screening: Drops of Heaven   org

Yoshiko Tatsumi is an 89-year-old Japanese culinary artist and writer, famous in Japan for Inochi no soup (“the soup of life”), a natural and nutritious soup which she has been making her entire life. Through discovering Yoshiko’s philosophy on slow food and nurturing life, this documentary film delves into the origin of the legendary soup which has warmed the hearts of many people, and which has also been an inspiration to cooks in hospitals across Japan. Filmed amidst the beautiful and delicate landscapes of Japan, the film offers a fascinating insight into Japanese home cooking throughout the seasons, recalling the forgotten days of people nurturing love and living in peace.

Directed by Atsunori Kawamura, 2012, 113 mins, Japanese with English subtitles


Date: 29 April 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


This event is now fully booked.

To register for the waiting list, please email your name and the name of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk

 

Images: © 2012 TENNOSHIZUKU FILM PARTNERS

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J-Basic Online for Teachers   org

This online course is for teachers with a basic level of Japanese who would like to build up their language skills. Through the course, you will develop a basic working knowledge of Japanese grammatical structures and build up your confidence and skills in using Japanese effectively in your classroom.  This course is provided by the Japan Foundation Sydney.

Course fee: approx. £75 - £120 (Depending on language level and exchange rate)

Who can sign up?
Any teacher residing in the UK, Australia or New Zealand who has a basic knowledge of Japanese, and can read hiragana and katakana.

What level of Japanese is it suitable for?
Four stages are available. We recommend you take the “level check test” to make sure you choose the best level for you. Stage 1 (the easiest) is suitable for those who know hiragana and katakana.  Stage 4 (the hardest) is about the same level at N5 (old Level 4) of the JLPT.

How does the course work?
Every week a new unit is uploaded. You will work through the unit at your own pace, and then complete your homework by the end of each week. Your homework will be marked and returned to you with helpful advice and comments from our Japanese Language Advisor. 

Feedback from previous participants:

“I have really enjoyed it, the course content is useful as covers all areas of the Japanese language i.e. speaking, listening, reading, writing – lots of writing practice which is a challenge but good practice!”

“I really, really like the Production task, especially as you get some prompt feedback from the Language Advisor. Brilliant!”

2014-15 Dates 

Session 1: 3 February – 28 March 2014
Session 2: 31 March – 23 May 2014
Session 3: 26 May – 18 July 2014
Session 4: 21 July – 12 September 2014
Session 5: 15 September– 7 November 2014
Session 6: 24 November 2014 -23 January 2015
  • Session 1: 3 February – 28 March 2014 (Deadline to enrol: 27 January)
  • Session 2: 31 March – 23 May 2014 (Deadline to enrol: 24 March)
  • Session 3: 26 May – 18 July 2014 (Deadline to enrol: 19 May)
  • Session 4: 21 July – 12 September 2014 (Deadline to enrol: 14 July)
  • Session 5: 15 September– 7 November 2014 (Deadline to enrol: 8 September)
  • Session 6: 24 November 2014 -23 January 2015 (Deadline to enrol: 17 November)

 For more information and to enrol, please go to http://www.jpf.org.au/jbasic


Date: 3 February 2014 - 23 January 2015
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SAVE THE DATE! 2014 Refresher Course for Teachers of Japanese!   org

The 2014 Refresher Course for Teachers of Japanese will take place on August 18th, 19th and 20th this year and will be open for bookings in due course.

This is a free  intensive language course for teachers who want to improve their Japanese language teaching skills, as well as their own language ability. It will be open to all non-native speaking teachers of Japanese, as well as teachers and PGCE students who have the chance to offer Japanese in future. 

The theme for the 2014 course is 「学ぼう!教室活動のネタ」- "Tips for class activities." The aim of the course will be to explore various classroom activities and ideas for teaching Japanese, while  at the same time brushing up your own Japanese language ability.

This course will be held at two levels: Intermediate and Advanced. Each day the course will run from 10:30 - 16:00, with a lunch break between 12:45 - 13:45.

Please note: This year, the Intermediate and Advanced classes will be held simultaneously in two rooms; for this reason, spaces will be limited to 24 participants in the Intermediate class, and 10 in the Advanced class. Additionally, all applicants will be required to complete a brief writing task when they apply, so that we can assign you to the appropriate class level.

We will provide more information and open for bookings soon, so keep on the look-out for further updates!


Date: 18 August 2014 - 20 August 2014 from 10.30am
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London

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LIFT 2014: Toshiki Okada’s Super Premium Soft Double Vanilla Rich   JPsupported

London International Festival of Theatre (LIFT) will present the UK premiere of Super Premium Soft Double Vanilla Rich, a new work by Japanese theatre director Toshiki Okada. Set in a supermarket, the play explores Japanese consumerism using dark humour, dreamlike movement and a striking soundscape of J-pop and JS Bach. The show will be performed in Japanese with English surtitles, and a Q&A with Okada’s theatre company chelfitsch will follow the performance on Wednesday 11 June.


Date: 10 June 2014 - 11 June 2014 from 7.30pm
Venue:

Pentland Theatre, artsdepot, London


For more information, please click here.
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