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Post 3.11 - What Can Art Do?
Case 3 - Listening to the Voices from Tohoku - Artists or Archivists?
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Special Free Film Screening: Drops of Heaven
LIFT 2014: Toshiki Okada’s Super Premium Soft Double Vanilla Rich

Post 3.11 - What Can Art Do?
Case 3 - Listening to the Voices from Tohoku - Artists or Archivists?
  org

Post 3.11 is a series of talks with individuals who through art have been involved in various ways in supporting the victims of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in the Tohoku region of Japan. Showcasing their activities, this series aims to examine how the role of the artist and art activities can be vital in such unprecedented situations, in spreading awareness and helping restore confidence among those affected, fundamentally questioning whether art has to have a practical social function. 
For this third session and to commemorate the third anniversary of the disaster of March 2011, the Japan Foundation has invited emerging artist duo Haruka Komori and Natsumi Seo, who moved to the Tohoku area immediately after the disaster and have since been working with the local people. Starting off with recording their observations on their online blog, Komori and Seo have been providing a voice for those who suffered, transforming the people's experiences into artworks.
Considering the role of artists in such unparalleled situations, Komori and Seo will discuss the aim of their practice and how their art can help those in the disaster stricken areas. In a discussion to follow, Komori and Seo will be joined by Meryl Doney, freelance curator and former director of Wallspace Gallery, London, and Mark Dean, an artist who includes archive footage to create his own works, to discuss the different ways artists can use the archive in their practice, and how these approaches can deliver their artistic intentions and stories, looking beyond art as an aesthetic.

Post 3.11 is a series of talks with individuals who through art have been involved in various ways in supporting the victims of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in the Tohoku region of Japan. Showcasing their activities, this series aims to examine how the role of the artist and art activities can be vital in such unprecedented situations, in spreading awareness and helping restore confidence among those affected, fundamentally questioning whether art has to have a practical social function.

For this third session and to commemorate the third anniversary of the disaster of March 2011, the Japan Foundation has invited emerging artist duo Haruka Komori and Natsumi Seo, who moved to the Tohoku area immediately after the disaster and have since been working with the local people. Starting off with recording their observations on their online blog, Komori and Seo have been providing a voice for those who suffered, transforming the people's experiences into artworks.

Considering the role of artists in such unparalleled situations, Komori and Seo will discuss the aim of their practice and how their art can help those in the disaster stricken areas. In a discussion to follow, Komori and Seo will be joined by Meryl Doney, freelance curator and former director of Wallspace Gallery, London, and Mark Dean, an artist who includes archive footage to create his own works, to discuss the different ways artists can use the archive in their practice, and how these approaches can deliver their artistic intentions and stories, looking beyond art as an aesthetic.


Date: 23 May 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk

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Special Free Film Screening: Drops of Heaven   org

Yoshiko Tatsumi is an 89-year-old Japanese culinary artist and writer, famous in Japan for Inochi no soup (“the soup of life”), a natural and nutritious soup which she has been making her entire life. Through discovering Yoshiko’s philosophy on slow food and nurturing life, this documentary film delves into the origin of the legendary soup which has warmed the hearts of many people, and which has also been an inspiration to cooks in hospitals across Japan. Filmed amidst the beautiful and delicate landscapes of Japan, the film offers a fascinating insight into Japanese home cooking throughout the seasons, recalling the forgotten days of people nurturing love and living in peace.

Directed by Atsunori Kawamura, 2012, 113 mins, Japanese with English subtitles


Date: 29 April 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


This event is now fully booked.

To register for the waiting list, please email your name and the name of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk

 

Images: © 2012 TENNOSHIZUKU FILM PARTNERS

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LIFT 2014: Toshiki Okada’s Super Premium Soft Double Vanilla Rich   JPsupported

London International Festival of Theatre (LIFT) will present the UK premiere of Super Premium Soft Double Vanilla Rich, a new work by Japanese theatre director Toshiki Okada. Set in a supermarket, the play explores Japanese consumerism using dark humour, dreamlike movement and a striking soundscape of J-pop and JS Bach. The show will be performed in Japanese with English surtitles, and a Q&A with Okada’s theatre company chelfitsch will follow the performance on Wednesday 11 June.


Date: 10 June 2014 - 11 June 2014 from 7.30pm
Venue:

Pentland Theatre, artsdepot, London


For more information, please click here.
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