Contact Us Sitemap

What's On

Click to see what's on in these sections


Public Seminar: The Real Story Behind Japan's Marriage Crisis
Public Seminar: Online Election Campaigns and Digital Democracy in Japan new
Public Seminar: The Happy Youth of a Desperate Country new
Public Seminar: The Role of Education in Disaster Risk Reduction: Lessons from Kobe and Tohoku new

Public Seminar: The Real Story Behind Japan's Marriage Crisis   org

In this special public seminar, sociologist and opinion-maker, Professor Masahiro Yamada (Chuo University) joins us to examine the reasons behind Japan’s falling marriage rate and what the future holds for the country's ‘parasite singles’.

Joining Prof Yamada in discussion will be Professor Joy Hendry, Emeritus Professor of Anthropology, Oxford Brookes University.

 

ABSTRACT
It is not just that the rate of marriage per se is declining in Japan, relationships between men and women are not actively developing in toto. The reasons for this are 1) the expectation that men ought to shoulder the burden of paying for household expenses after marriage continues to be strong, 2) the incomes of young men have become increasingly unstable, and 3) almost all unmarried people continue to live in with their parents.  In short, although people would like to form ‘traditional families’ (nuclear families) of their own, the economic circumstances will not allow this and the number of unmarrieds who continue to live in their parent’s home as ‘parasite singles’ is increasing instead. One consequence of this is that young people are increasingly attracted to ‘virtual romance’ in anime and with idols.

ABSTRACT

It is not just that the rate of marriage per se is declining in Japan, relationships between men and women are not actively developing in toto. The reasons for this are 1) the expectation that men ought to shoulder the burden of paying for household expenses after marriage continues to be strong, 2) the incomes of young men have become increasingly unstable, and 3) almost all unmarried people continue to live with their parents.  In short, although people would like to form ‘traditional families’ (nuclear families) of their own, the economic circumstances will not allow this and the number of unmarrieds who continue to live in their parents' home as ‘parasite singles’ is increasing instead. One consequence of this is that young people are increasingly attracted to ‘virtual romance’ in anime and with idols.


Date: 6 November 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk

 

**Prof Yamada will also be speaking at Manchester University on 4 November, 2014.  Click here for more information

Back to Top

Public Seminar: Online Election Campaigns and Digital Democracy in Japan   org

 

In April 2013 Japan’s Public Offices Election Law was revised and a ban on using the Internet for election campaigns was lifted. Prior to the revision, there were hopes that this would stimulate greater political debate and lead to increased voter turnout, particularly among younger voters. Contrary to expectations, however, the introduction of web-based electioneering appears to have had little influence on voting patterns and election results.

In this special public seminar, Dr Ryosuke Nishida (Ritsumeikan University) joins us to chart the rise of web-based election campaigns in Japan and to examine the current debates surrounding this new form of electioneering.  With reference to the recent Upper House and Tokyo gubernatorial elections, Nishida will also explain why Internet election campaigns have thus far failed to attract more young voters to the polls.    

Joining Nishida in discussion following his presentation will be Dr Andy Williamson, an internationally recognised expert in digital democracy, online campaigning and citizen engagement. 


Date: 10 November 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk

 

Image: Satoko Kawasaki

Back to Top

Public Seminar: The Happy Youth of a Desperate Country   org

In this special public seminar, Japan’s leading young sociologist and author of the controversial book The Happy Youth of a Desperate Country’ Noritoshi Furuichi (Tokyo University), joins us to explain why, despite fewer opportunities for long-term stable employment, the majority of Japan’s youth are in fact satisfied with their lives, and how this contentment challenges the dominant media discourse which portrays young adults as a disappointed and unhappy generation.   Furuichi will also examine why young Japanese seem to be politically apathetic even in the face of rising social inequalities and an uncertain future.  

Joining Furuichi in discussion following his presentation will be Dr Tuukka Toivonen from SOAS, University of London.  


Date: 12 November 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

Rm642, Institute of Education, University of London, 20 Bedford Way, WC1H OAL 

http://20bedfordway.com/how-to-find-us/


Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk

Image: masaru minoya 

Back to Top

Public Seminar: The Role of Education in Disaster Risk Reduction: Lessons from Kobe and Tohoku   org

The Japan Foundation, in collaboration with Kobe University and Miyagi University of Education, is delighted to present this special public seminar looking at the role of education in disaster risk reduction.  We will be joined by scholars from both universities who will introduce their projects for promoting disaster risk reduction and creating more resilient societies.  

This event will be moderated by Prof Ros Wade from London South Bank University.


Date: 13 November 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please email your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk

 

      

Back to Top