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Public Seminar: 50 Years of the Shinkansen new
Public Seminar: The Real Story Behind Japan's Marriage Crisis new

Public Seminar: 50 Years of the Shinkansen   org

The Japan Foundation is delighted to present this special public seminar marking the 50th anniversary of the Tokaido Shinkansen.  Joining us will be Yoshinori Hatta, General Manager of JR Tokai London Office, who will chart the history of the Tokaido Shinkansen, highlighting its strengths and achievements, while also looking to the future and the development of the new ChuĊ Shinkansen. Also joining us will be Dr Christopher Hood, Reader in Japanese Studies, Cardiff University, who will examine the regional differences in design and usage of the Shinkansen and how this in turn reflects the diversity of Japanese cultures. 


Date: 31 October 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk

 

Images: Top Left: Daylight9899; Centre/Top Right/Bottom Right: Dr Christopher Hood

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Public Seminar: The Real Story Behind Japan's Marriage Crisis   org

In this special public seminar, sociologist and opinion-maker, Professor Masahiro Yamada (Chuo University) joins us to examine the reasons behind Japan’s falling marriage rate and what the future holds for the country's ‘parasite singles’.

Joining Prof Yamada in discussion will be Professor Joy Hendry, Emeritus Professor of Anthropology, Oxford Brookes University.

 

ABSTRACT
It is not just that the rate of marriage per se is declining in Japan, relationships between men and women are not actively developing in toto. The reasons for this are 1) the expectation that men ought to shoulder the burden of paying for household expenses after marriage continues to be strong, 2) the incomes of young men have become increasingly unstable, and 3) almost all unmarried people continue to live in with their parents.  In short, although people would like to form ‘traditional families’ (nuclear families) of their own, the economic circumstances will not allow this and the number of unmarrieds who continue to live in their parent’s home as ‘parasite singles’ is increasing instead. One consequence of this is that young people are increasingly attracted to ‘virtual romance’ in anime and with idols.

ABSTRACT

It is not just that the rate of marriage per se is declining in Japan, relationships between men and women are not actively developing in toto. The reasons for this are 1) the expectation that men ought to shoulder the burden of paying for household expenses after marriage continues to be strong, 2) the incomes of young men have become increasingly unstable, and 3) almost all unmarried people continue to live with their parents.  In short, although people would like to form ‘traditional families’ (nuclear families) of their own, the economic circumstances will not allow this and the number of unmarrieds who continue to live in their parents' home as ‘parasite singles’ is increasing instead. One consequence of this is that young people are increasingly attracted to ‘virtual romance’ in anime and with idols.


Date: 6 November 2014 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Japan Foundation, London


Booking:

This event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please e-mail your name and the title of the event you would like to attend to event@jpf.org.uk

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