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Public Seminar: STEMming the Gender Gap: A New Era for Japanese Women in Science and Engineering? new
Japanese Study Seminar in Alsace 2015: Call for Participation! new
SAKE: Tradition Meets Innovation - The Story of the First Non-Japanese Sake Master Brewer new
Central and Local Governance in Japan and the UK: Lessons from Okinawa and Scotland new

Public Seminar: STEMming the Gender Gap: A New Era for Japanese Women in Science and Engineering?   org

In January 2014, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe stated that ‘Japan should be the place that gives women the opportunity to shine. Thirty per cent of leadership positions should be occupied by women by 2020’. This promise seemed to herald a new era for women in the workplace in Japan.

30 years ago, the Equal Employment Opportunity Law was introduced in Japan which was intended to enable companies to fully utilise human resources regardless of gender. Despite this, even in 2013, the proportion of female leaders in large corporations was only 10.2 percent. 

Although the gender gap in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) does vary greatly from country to country, the number of Japanese women in these fields remains particularly low, and the proportion of female researchers in science and technology is still one of the lowest (14.4 percent) among OECD countries.

Why so few? In this seminar, Dr Naonori Kodate (University College Dublin) will try to answer this question, by shedding light on historical developments and the current gender equality situation in Japan through the lens of women in STEM. He will explore how gender equality policy in science has been intertwined with social norms, family and individual life decisions and other policies. He will also look into measures the government, universities and research institutes are taking to address this issue, and explore whether these measures have led to an increase in female representation in these fields.

During this special seminar, we are also delighted to welcome Dr Ekaterina Hertog (University of Oxford), an expert on Japanese family trends, who will join Dr Kodate in conversation to explore the effect of changes in Japanese family structure on the position of Japanese women in STEM. 

Contributors:

Dr Naonori Kodate is a Lecturer in Social Policy at University College Dublin, Ireland. His main research area is comparative social policy, particularly in health care. His book, Japanese Women in Science and Engineering: History and Policy Change (co-authored by Professor Emeritus Kashiko Kodate) will be published in July 2015 by Routledge.

Dr Ekaterina Hertog is a family sociologist in the Department of Sociology and the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies at the University of Oxford. Her current research interests include contemporary Japanese society, marriage and childbearing trends in industrialised countries, and marriage partner selection. 

Image: Peter Close/Shutterstock.com


Date: 1 July 2015 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Swedenborg Society, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London, WC1A 2TH


Booking: The event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please send an email to event@jpf.org.uk.

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Japanese Study Seminar in Alsace 2015: Call for Participation!   org

The deadline for applications has been extended until July 15 2015.

The Japan Foundation and Centre Européen d'Etudes Japonaises d'Alsace (CEEJA) are now accepting applications for participation in Japanese Study Seminar: Everyday Life and Culture (日常生活文化) scheduled for 21st and 22nd September, 2015 at CEEJA, in Kientzheim, France. The official language of the seminar will be JAPANESE.

This seminar aims to encourage networking among young researchers on Japan in Europe and further promote Japanese Studies in Europe.

Participants will join a two-day intensive workshop in the cozy and intimate atmosphere of CEEJA's facility in Kientzheim where they will present and discuss their current research projects with fellow participants and guest mentors from Japan.

The theme of this year’s seminar will be “Everyday Life and Culture (日常生活文化).”  We are calling for applications from young researchers in Europe specialising in politics, history, sociology, literature, arts, language, philosophy, economics, architecture, religion, etc. 

Please note that the deadlnie for applications has been extended to 15th July, 2015.

For further details including eligibility and application procedures, please visit the Japan Foundation Tokyo website here.


Date: 21 September 2015 - 22 September 2015
Venue:

Centre Européen d'Etudes Japonaises d'Alsace (CEEJA), Kientzheim, France


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SAKE: Tradition Meets Innovation - The Story of the First Non-Japanese Sake Master Brewer   org

The brewing of sake is a craft steeped with tradition, but one which has risen to many new challenges in modern times.

Philip Harper has a unique perspective on tradition and innovation in the world of sake, having worked for more than 20 years in the industry, and being the only non-Japanese to have earned the prestigious title of ‘toji’ or master brewer.

Japanese sake has played an important role in Japanese culture since ancient times, but in recent times social change had pushed sake towards the periphery of Japanese lifestyle. In response to this, innovative efforts have been made to revitalise the sake market within Japan, as well as to widen its appeal internationally.

In this special talk, through sharing his own experiences of learning the complex and sometimes arcane traditions of sake-brewing, Philip Harper will also shed light on how the sake industry has responded to recent challenges, preserving traditional methods and wisdom, while adopting new modern techniques in production and marketing.

Philip’s own range of sake embodies this marriage of innovation and tradition, bucking modern trends to brew to traditional forgotten recipes, and using adventurous techniques to create new flavours.

At this special seminar, held in the grand Conway Hall, guests will not only have the rare opportunity to put their questions to a toji, but they will also be able to sample some of Phillip’s sake from the award-winning Kinoshita Brewery in Kyoto.

Also joining us will be Rie Yoshitake who will introduce the activities of the Sake Samurai association, an organisation formed by young sake brewers in Japan which works to protect sake traditions and to promote sake in overseas markets.

Image (right): Tsukinokatsura, Hyogo


Date: 6 July 2015 from 6.45pm
Venue:

Conway Hall, London, WC1R 4RL


Booking:

**This event is now FULLY BOOKED**  

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Central and Local Governance in Japan and the UK: Lessons from Okinawa and Scotland   org

 

The coral reefs, white sand beaches and sub-tropical rainforests of Okinawa, a chain of islands stretching over 600 miles of ocean between Southwest Japan and Taiwan, seem a distant world from the misty mountains and lochs of Scotland, but recent political developments in Scotland have brought to light some surprising parallels.
Likes Scotland, Okinawa is a smaller, once independent, area incorporated within a far larger entity, which possesses its own distinct history, culture and  political outlook. Debate on the balance between central and local governance has recently taken prominence in political discussion in Okinawa, and last September, intrigued by recent events in Scotland, several Okinawan journalists and researchers, including the founding member of a small but growing Okinawa independence movement, flew to Edinburgh to observe the independence  referendum.
Professor Takayoshi Egami (Waseda University), is an expert in regional policy in Okinawa, having worked as a lecturer and researcher at the University of the Ryukyus in Okinawa for over 26 years. Since last September, he has spent one year as a visiting researcher at the University of Edinburgh to draw lessons from developments in devolution in Scotland post referendum.
In this seminar Professor Egami will discuss the complex historical and political background of Okinawa prefecture, which lies behind recent interest in devolution in the region.
After his talk he will be joined for a comparative discussion on devolution in the UK and Japan by Professor Paul Cairney, Professor of Politics and Public Policy at the University of Stirling, an expert in both Scottish politics and UK-wide comparative public policy.
Recent discussion on devolution and regionalisation in the UK and Japan has not been confined to Scotland and Okinawa of course. Recent hot topics in the UK have included devolving more powers to Wales, ‘The Northern Powerhouse’ and the development of London as a city state, while in Japan,  debate was recently ignited  over  plans to devolve more powers to Osaka City. Through exploring some of these issues, Prof Cairney and Prof Egami will discuss what can be learned from the experience of each country and how regionalisation may develop in future years.
The seminar will be followed by an opportunity to pose your own devolution-related questions to the experts, and a drinks reception.The coral reefs, white sand beaches and sub-tropical rainforests of Okinawa, a chain of islands stretching over 600 miles of ocean between Southwest Japan and Taiwan, seem a distant world from the misty mountains and lochs of Scotland, but recent political developments in Scotland have brought to light some surprising parallels.

The coral reefs, white sand beaches and sub-tropical rainforests of Okinawa, a chain of islands stretching over 600 miles of ocean between Southwest Japan and Taiwan, seem a distant world from the misty mountains and lochs of Scotland, but recent political developments in Scotland have brought to light some surprising parallels.

Like Scotland, Okinawa is a smaller, once independent, area incorporated within a far larger entity, which possesses its own distinct history, culture and  political outlook. Debate on the balance between central and local governance has recently taken prominence in political discussion in Okinawa, and last September, intrigued by recent events in Scotland, several Okinawan journalists and researchers, including the founding member of an Okinawa independence movement, flew to Edinburgh to observe the independence  referendum.

Professor Takayoshi Egami (Waseda University), is an expert in regional policy in Okinawa, having worked as a lecturer and researcher at the University of the Ryukyus in Okinawa for over 26 years. Since last September, he has spent one year as a visiting researcher at the University of Edinburgh to draw lessons from developments in devolution in Scotland post referendum.

In this seminar Professor Egami will discuss the complex historical and political background of Okinawa prefecture, which lies behind recent interest in devolution in the region.

After his talk he will be joined for a comparative discussion on devolution in the UK and Japan by Professor Paul Cairney, Professor of Politics and Public Policy at the University of Stirling, an expert in both Scottish politics and UK-wide comparative public policy.

Recent discussion on devolution and regionalism in the UK and Japan has not been confined to Scotland and Okinawa of course. Recent hot topics in the UK have included devolving more powers to Wales, the 'Northern Powerhouse’ and even the development of London as a city state, while in Japan, debate was recently ignited  over  plans to devolve more powers to Osaka City. Through exploring some of these issues, Professor Cairney and Professor Egami will discuss what can be learned from the experience of each country and how regionalism may develop in future years.

The seminar will be followed by an opportunity to pose your own devolution-related questions to the experts, and a drinks reception.

Image (left): Martin M303/Shutterstock.com

Image (right): (c)Tomo.Yun (http://www.yunphoto.net)


Date: 22 July 2015 from 6.30pm
Venue:

The Swedenborg Society, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London, WC1A 2TH


Booking: The event is free to attend but booking is essential. To reserve a place, please send an email to event@jpf.org.uk.

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