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Kimono Crossing the Sea - Its Power to Inspire Imagination and Creativity new
Game + Culture: Co-evolution of Japanese Video Games and Society new
Kobanashi Workshop for Educators – Kobanashi Performance Instruction Methods to Teach Japanese Language Learners new
Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival Screenings and Special Talk Events new
Spirits of Action: Japanese Manga and Sports new
Carving Out Beauty - The Life and Work of Munakata Shiko new
Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk Exhibition at the V&A
Japan Society Sixth Form Japan Week 2020 - Japan Foundation Online Japanese Language Workshop for Students new
The 16th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students new

Kimono Crossing the Sea - Its Power to Inspire Imagination and Creativity   org

 

‘Kimono’ is a word that has long been synonymous with the image of Japan and Japanese culture. Though it was once cast aside by modern women who viewed it as old-fashioned and impractical to wear, much appreciation is now given to the kimono, especially among the younger generation and global fashion designers who believe it is expressive and on trend. It isn’t the first time, however, that the kimono is at the center of attention; in fact an enthusiastic admiration of the wardrobe piece was demonstrated in western Europe in the latter half of the 19th century when various Japanese products such as ukiyo-e had spread overseas, and the ‘Japonisme’ whirlwind had taken over. For progressive artists such as Manet and Whistler, as well as innovative fashion designers such as Paul Poiret and Madeleine Vionnet, the kimono was not merely a beautiful garment invoking exoticism, but an inspirational source for their creativity and, as a result, we are able to perceive its significant influence in their pieces.

What was it about the kimono that mesmerized and captured the imagination of those artists?

Celebrating the UK’s first comprehensive exhibition about the kimono – Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk – at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London (running until 25 October 2020), the Japan Foundation has invited renowned fashion historian and curator, FUKAI Akiko, to talk about kimono as it was depicted in the latter half of 19th century and the intriguing relationship between the kimono and artists. Reflecting on the fact that its significance has been relatively dismissed in art and fashion history, she will explore what kimono meant to these masters and what they drew out of stylish, oriental fashion.

The talk will be preceded by a brief introduction by Anna Jackson, the Curator of Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk, and a brief conversation with FUKAI Akiko will follow her lecture.

 

About the speakers

FUKAI Akiko

Award-winning and renowned fashion historian and Director/Curator Emeritus of the Kyoto Costume Institute, FUKAI Akiko obtained an MA and honorary doctorate at Ochanomizu University and studied Art History at the Université de Paris IV (Institute des Arts et de l’ Archeologie). She has organized several major and acclaimed fashion exhibitions such as “Japonism in Fashion,” and “Future Beauty: 30 Years of Japanese Fashion” in Japan and overseas. She is also the author of multiple influential books including Reading Fashion from Pictures (PHP Institute, Kyoto, 2009), and Kimono and Japonism (Heibonsha, Tokyo, 2017) as well as Fashion (Taschen, Köln, 2002), of which 650 thousand copies have been sold so far.

Anna Jackson

Anna Jackson is Keeper of the Asian Department at the Victoria and Albert Museum. A specialist in Japanese textiles and dress, she has written widely on the subject and is the curator of the exhibition Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk and editor of the accompanying publication. Her other major research interest is the cultural relationship between Asia and Europe. In 2004 she was co-curator of Encounters: the Meeting of Asia and Europe 1500-1800 and in 2009 lead curator of Maharaja: the Splendour of India’s Royal Courts, which subsequently toured internationally.

 

Image credit:

Mrs George Smith (partial cropped version), Frederic William Burton. Private Collection. Image: National Gallery of Ireland

 

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.

To book your place, please click here.

Last chance to see!

The Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum will close on 25 October 2020. The exhibition is financially supported by the Japan Foundation.


Date: 16 October 2020 from 12.00pm

For more information, please click here.
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Game + Culture: Co-evolution of Japanese Video Games and Society   org

 

From the likes of the Super Mario series to the more recent Animal Crossing and e-sports, Japanese video games have been widely acknowledged as some of the best in business, attracting evangelical fans all over the world. Though ostensibly created with borderless content and universal characters, it is argued by some that Japanese video games are deeply embedded in and reflective of Japanese society. Their palpable spirit and philosophies may be understood as being sourced from Japan’s old traditions, even from well-known art forms such as haiku and the practice of tea ceremony. However, it is difficult to perceive at a glance how these seemingly unrelated pretechnological art forms and culture have influenced 21st century digital content.

Inviting HIRABAYASHI Hisakazu, a video game journalist and analyst, this special talk aims to identify ‘Japaneseness’ in digital game content, analysing to what degree it has rooted from Japanese cultural as well as social history and to what extent it is indebted to old Japanese traditions. While illustrating some characteristics of leading game companies such as Nintendo, HIRABAYASHI also explains the future visions of these companies and game creators against a background of the recent evidence of a decline in the global share of Japanese games. 

A brief conversation with Culture Director of the BGI, Iain Simons, will follow HIRABAYASHI’s lecture.

 

About the speakers

HIRABAYASHI Hisakazu (Interact Co., Ltd. CEO / Game analyst) In 1985, after graduating from Aoyama Gakuin University, he joined the publishing company Takarajima where he worked as editor of a game specialty magazine. In 1991, he established Interact Co., Ltd., a consulting company specializing in the game industry, and started supporting companies entering the game industry. He currently works as a consultant of the game industry, a journalist, and a commentator on television and radio programs. HIRABAYASHI’s works include the book Gemū no daigaku (The University of Gaming) and Gemū no jiji mondai (Current Issues in Gaming). He is an editorial board member of Digital content white paper of Japan, as well as a board member of the Japan Game Culture Foundation.

Iain Simons makes, writes and talks about videogames and culture across many popular and specialist media. He has written numerous books and papers and regularly contributes to conferences and events around the world. In 2005 he curated the first videogame festival at London’s SouthBank Centre, after which he founded GameCity in 2006. In 2008, this project led to co-founding the first National Videogame Archive, with the National Media Museum. In 2015 he co-founded the National Videogame Arcade, the acclaimed cultural centre for games, which following a merger with the BGI relaunched as the National Videogame Museum. He has worked as a creative consultant with many organisations including the BBC, ArtsDepot, British Film Institute, Barbican Centre, NHS and sits on the heritage advisory board of BAFTA.

Image credit: Partial photo of retro Nintendo games by Nick Hamze on Unsplash

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.

To book your place, please click here.


Date: 12 November 2020 from 12.00pm

For more information, please click here.
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Kobanashi Workshop for Educators – Kobanashi Performance Instruction Methods to Teach Japanese Language Learners   org

The Japan Foundation, London

 

Kobanashi Workshop for Educators – Kobanashi Performance Instruction Methods to Teach Japanese Language Learners

Workshop Format:Online(Zoom software)

Dates

Time

Number of Participants

30th October 2020 (Fri)

17:00 - 19:00(GMT Greenwich Meantime)

15

31st October 2020 (Sat)

15:00 - 17:00(GMT Greenwich Meantime)

15

Instructor:Dr. Kazumi Hatasa(Purdue University, United States of America; Chair, Dept. of East Asian Language and Cultures, SLC, Asian Studies Faculty).

Guidelines for Prospective Participants:PDF Sign-Up Guidelines

The application form link is included on the Sign-Up Guidelines PDF. We would like to ask prospective participants to read the guidelines carefully and then fill out the application form. 

※Sign-Up Deadline: 5th October (Monday), 17:00 (BST)


Date: 30 October 2020 - 31 October 2020
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Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival Screenings and Special Talk Events   org

 

The Japan Foundation London and Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival have teamed up!

We've partnered with Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival, which is back this October to celebrate its 10th anniversary, on free, online and live screenings on their YouTube channel. Four screenings will be presented, with short film programmes featuring award winning film makers and emerging talents from various universities across Japan.

Date: 24 and 25 October, at various times

 

In addition to the free streaming of some of the most innovative and inspiring Japanese animation works, we offer you opportunities to virtually meet the creators behind them. From knitting to clay, you will see how versatile Japanese animation techniques can be. 

All events listed below are free and take place online via Zoom. Join us in this creative hub, wherever you may be!

 

Knitting into Animation

Online Talk with YATA Miho and YODA Takeshi

Who could have imagined that colourful wool threads could be transformed into a cute and fun animation with lots of sheep! YATA Miho, a Japanese animation creator, mesmerized viewers when her work was streamed as part of the Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival special in July.  Together with YODA Takeshi, composer and theremin player who performed the memorable music in The King of Amechau Country, they will talk about their creative processes and their sources of inspiration in this online talk. Their presentations will be followed by a conversation with Abigail Addison.

Saturday, 24 October from 13:00 (BST)

Book here.

 

 

Animation Workshop with ARAI Chie

Online Workshop

ARAI Chie is the creator behind the twinkling and friendly mascot of the Kotatsu Japanese Animation Festival. She is also an animator who created the festival’s opening animations and other short films. Her drawings are quite often seen in the form of flip books, and bring to mind a similarity to manga. In this workshop, she will explain where the idea for the cute character came from, illustrating step-by-step the process of her creation. Participants will be invited to join a brief session in which they can try and test their skill on paper to check their potential for being a future animator! Moderated by Shangomola, a London based manga artist.

Sunday, 25 October from 12:00 (BST)

Book here.

 

 

Clay Metamorphosis

Online Talk with YUSAKI Fusako

Having lived and worked in Italy, YUSAKI Fusako is an award-wining female creator and a pioneer of Japanese clay animation. Metamorphosing clay into a lively animation rich in colours defines her work and her philosophy: nothing remains the same. In this very special talk, in conversation with Robin Lyons – a producer of animation works and the Managing Director of Calon – YUSAKI will explore her long-standing career and how her life and work has changed shape like the ever-malleable materials she loves.  This is a rare opportunity not to be missed.

Sunday, 25 October from 14:00 (BST)

Book here.


Date: 24 October 2020 - 25 October 2020

In partnership with:

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Spirits of Action: Japanese Manga and Sports   org

 

Being an avid manga reader and a sport fanatic may seem to be mutually exclusive characteristics. In Japanese manga history, however, they have always been a good match and played well together in attracting manga fans as well as enthusiastic sports players. From tennis to judo, a huge variety of sports have been a source of inspiration for the ‘sports manga’ form of the graphic novel read by girls, boys, and young adults alike, and the genre has kept driving the market and readership forward. Certain works have gained huge momentum and have become a trend in Japanese society. The genre’s continuing popularity and influence is proven in the fact that many ‘sports manga’ titles have been adapted into other media such as film and animation.

In the lead up to TOKYO2020 (postponed to next year), the Japan Foundation has invited YOSHIMURA Kazuma of Kyoto Seika University to talk about the inseparable relationship between manga and sports. Succinctly tracing its history from post-war to today, YOSHIMURA will discuss the position of ‘sports manga’ in Japanese culture and how its contents have evolved to reflect the time, society and people’s spirits, and indeed how the genre has managed to keep attracting Japanese readers, as well as manga artists, even while changing its shape.

After YOSHIMURA’s presentation, there will be a brief conversation with Rayna Denison.

 

About the speakers

YOSHIMURA Kazuma completed coursework for a Ph.D. program at Ritsumeikan University. He currently serves as the head of the Faculty of Manga, as well as at the International Manga Research Center. His field of research is in the history of philosophy and manga studies. Yoshimura’s published work includes Manga’s Handling of Prejudice (2007), Manga Textbook (2008), Multiple Hiroshima (2012), ‘Chiran’ as a convenient manga experience – Media dynamics of ‘Authentic record on KAMIKAZE’ (printed in The Birth of Chiran, edited by Yoshiaki Fukuma, Makoto Yamazaki, 2015), and Osamu Tezuka – ‘the God of Manga’ fostered by unfavorable wind (printed in Intellectual History of Japanese People Vol.4 (2015, Iwanami Shoten).

Rayna Denison is a Senior Lecturer in and Head of Department for the Film, Television and Media Studies at the University of East Anglia. Her research and teaching interests centre on Japanese film and animation. She is the author of Anime: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury 2015), and the editor of Princess Mononoke: Understanding Studio Ghibli’s Monster Princess (Bloomsbury 2018). Her scholarly articles can be found in many leading journals, including Cinema Journal, Velvet Light Trap, Japan Forum and the International Journal of Cultural Studies.

 

Image credit: 原作/恵本裕子、脚色・構成・作画/小林まこと『JJM 女子柔道部物語』第1巻(講談社、2016年) ©小林まこと/講談社

 

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.

To book your place, please click here.


Date: 28 October 2020 from 12.00pm
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Carving Out Beauty - The Life and Work of Munakata Shiko   org

 

"Like the vastness of space, like a universe unlimited, untold, unattainable, and inscrutable- that is the woodcut."

– Shiko Munakata.
(Munakata: the “Way” of the Woodcut, Brooklyn, Pratt Adlib Press, 1961)

 

Best known for his earlier phase of black and white woodblock prints, MUNAKATA Shiko (1903-1975) is one of the greatest Japanese artists of the 20th century. His works are instantly recognisable by the expressive urgency with which he worked to bring out the vitality that is characteristic of his art. A self-taught artist, he continued to be inspired by the love of nature and folk traditions of his native Aomori. Perhaps the most indicative element of his work has been the Buddhist imagery created in Toyama (after the 1945 bombing of Tokyo forced him to escape the capital), which heavily featured in his prints and earned him a number of accolades from esteemed temples of Japan. He made his mark on an international scale, too, receiving first prize in exhibitions held in Lugano (1952), Sao Paulo (1955), Venice (1956), and Hayward Gallery in London (1991), as part of an exhibition which subsequently toured in the UK.

Ensuring the legacy of his name lives on in present day, independent curator and researcher, ISHII Yoriko, has been a key figure in lectures and publications aimed at revealing a hidden side of the folk art master. As MUNAKATA’s granddaughter, she is arguably best equipped to do so.

Commemorating the 45th anniversary of MUNAKATA’s death, The Japan Foundation is delighted to welcome her as she delivers an insightful online talk about the life and work of the artist, drawing on personal memories of him to paint a picture of the man behind the woodblock prints. Elaborating on the philosophy and techniques used by MUNAKATA in his work, as well as the different stages of this career as an artist, ISHII will explain the significance his prints continue to have – both in Japan and globally – and what is being done to preserve his memory.

After her presentation, ISHII will have a brief conversation with artist, educator and author, Elspeth Lamb.

 

About the speakers

ISHII Yoriko

Born in Tokyo in 1956, she is the granddaughter of MUNAKATA Shiko. After graduating from university, she began working as a curator at the Munakata Museum of Art (closed in 2011) in Kamakura City. In recent years, through exhibition supervision, writing, lectures, and similar activities, she has worked to convey the lesser known attributes of her grandfather. ISHII is also currently a special researcher at Nanto Shiritsu Fukumitsu Museum.

 

Elspeth Lamb

Elspeth Lamb is an artist, educator and author. Her book ‘Papermaking for Printmakers’ was published by A&C Black London in 2006 and sells worldwide. She has exhibited in New York, London, Tokyo, Kyoto and Toronto and she has been artist in residence in Japan several times since 2000 ,studying and researching with hanga masters and more recently with a Unesco Hosokawa-shi papermaking master in Ogawa, Japan.

 

This talk has been made possible with the kind assistance of Kayoko Tezuka, Tuning for the Future (TFF) in Japan.

http://www.npo-tff.org 

 

Image credit: In Praise of Flower Hunting, 1954 /「華狩頌(はなかりしょう)1954」, Shiko Munakata

 

Please note that this session will be hosted on Zoom.


Date: 20 October 2020 from 12.00pm

For more information, please click here.
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Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk Exhibition at the V&A   JPsupported
Fashionable brocade patterns of the Imperial Palace, woodblock print, made by Utagawa Kunisada, 1847-1852, Japan. Museum no. Circ.636 to Circ. 638– 1962. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Fashionable brocade patterns of the Imperial Palace, woodblock print, made by Utagawa Kunisada, 1847-1852, Japan. Museum no. Circ.636 to Circ. 638– 1962. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Stunning 17th-century Japanese garments, international haute couture and costumes from Star Wars come together in a major V&A exhibition on kimono fashion.

The V&A has created Europe’s first major exhibition on kimono. The ultimate symbol of Japan, the kimono is often perceived as traditional, timeless and unchanging. Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk will counter this conception, presenting the garment as a dynamic and constantly evolving icon of fashion.

The exhibition will reveal the sartorial and social significance of the kimono from the 1660s to the present day, both in Japan and in the rest of the world. Rare 17th and 18thcentury kimono will be displayed for the first time in the UK, together with fashions by major designers and iconic film and performance costumes. The kimono’s recent reinvention on the streets of Japan will also be explored through work by an exciting new wave of contemporary designers and stylists.

Highlights of the exhibition include a kimono created by Living National Treasure Kunihiko Moriguchi, the dress designed for Björk by Alexander McQueen and worn on the album cover Homogenic, and original Star Wars costumes modelled on kimono by John Mollo and Trisha Biggar. Designs by Yves Saint Laurent, Rei Kawakubo and John Galliano will reveal the kimono’s role as a constant source of inspiration for fashion designers. Paintings, prints, film, dress accessories and other objects will feature throughout the exhibition, providing additional context to the fascinating story of the style, appeal and influence of the kimono. Over 315 works will be featured, including kimono especially made for the show, half drawn from the V&A’s superlative collections and the rest generously lent by museums and private collections in Britain, Europe, America and Japan.

Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk begins in the mid-17th century when a vibrant fashion culture emerged in Japan. The increasingly wealthy merchant classes demanded the latest styles to express their affluence, confidence and taste, while leading actors and famous courtesans were the trend-setters of the day. The simple structure of the kimono focussed attention on the surface, allowing for the creation of sumptuous patterns using sophisticated techniques. The first section of the exhibition will explore these designs and shine a light on a fashion-conscious society not dissimilar to today’s, in which desire for the latest look was fed by a cult of celebrity and encouraged by makers, sellers and publishers.

Kimono were first exported to Europe in the mid-17th century, where they had an immediate impact on clothing styles. Foreign fabrics were also brought to Japan and incorporated into kimono. Rare survivors from this early period of cultural exchange, including garments made in Japan for the Dutch and kimono tailored from French brocade and Indian chintz, will be displayed to reveal the fluid fashion relationship between East and West that resulted from the global trade network.

The late 19th century saw a world-wide craze for Japanese art and design. Kimono bought from department stores such as Liberty & Co. in London were worn by those wishing to express their artistic flair. Japan responded by making boldly embroidered ‘kimono for foreigners’, while the domestic market was transformed by the use of European textile technology and chemical dyes. The kimono’s biggest impact on western fashion came in the early 20th century, when designers such as Paul Poiret, Mariano Fortuny and Madeleine Vionnet abandoned tightly-corseted styles in favour of loose layers of fabric that draped the body.

The final section of the exhibition will show how the kimono has continued to inspire fashion designers around the world. The potential of the garment to be translated and transformed is seen in designs by Thom Browne, Duro Olowu and Yohji Yamamoto. The kimono’s timeless, universal quality has also made it the ideal costume for film and performance. The display will include the outfit worn by Toshirō Mifune in Sanjūrō, Oscar-winning costumes from Memoirs of a Geisha, and the Jean Paul Gautier ensemble worn by Madonna in her video Nothing Really Matters. Japan itself is currently witnessing a resurgence of interest in kimono. Jōtarō Saitō designs kimono couture for the catwalk, Hiroko Takahashi seeks to bridge the divide between art and fashion, and more casual styles are created by small, independent studios such as Rumi Rock and Modern Antenna.

Anna Jackson, curator of Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk at the V&A, said: ‘From the sophisticated culture of 17th -century Kyoto to the creativity of the contemporary catwalk, the kimono is unique in its aesthetic importance and cultural impact giving it a fascinating place within the story of fashion.’

 

Captured just before the V&A museum closed it's doors for lockdown, follow the Japan Foundation supported exhibition Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk as its curator Anna Jackson leads an intimate 5-part tour through the exhibition spaces, providing a behind the scene look at the show, star exhibits and the history of the kimono.

Take a deeper look at all five parts by following the links below:

Part 1    Part 2    Part 3    Part 4    Part 5


Date: 27 August 2020 - 25 October 2020

For more information, please click here.
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Japan Society Sixth Form Japan Week 2020 - Japan Foundation Online Japanese Language Workshop for Students  

We are honoured this year to be participating once again in Japan Society’s Sixth Form Japan event. This is a yearly event for sixth form students who attend to learn all about Japan and its language and culture.

Please note that this event will take place online and that it is open to Sixth Form students.

If you have any questions, please contact The Japan Society directly. You can find out how using this link.

The Japan Foundation, London will be running a language session on Japanese onomatopoeia.

---

Dokidoki! Express yourself using Japanese sounds.

Date: Tuesday 1st December 2020

Just as in English, the Japanese language has many onomatopoeia, and thousands more to choose from! Japanese speakers use them regularly in their daily conversation to express and also bring to life, not only the sounds, but also emotions and actions of any given scene or situation. In this interactive workshop, led by the Japan Foundation, London, you will be introduced to the rich variety of Japanese onomatopoeia and the Japanese visual language, manpu, frequently used in Manga to convey emotions through signs and symbols alone.


Date: 1 December 2020
Venue:

Online


For more information, please click here.
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The 16th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students  

 

We are delighted to announce that the 16th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students is open for applications!
This contest gives students the chance to make their voices heard in Japanese, and win some fantastic prizes! Finals Day will be held online, on Saturday 6th March 2021.
:: Contest Aims
The main purpose of the event is to improve the speaking and presentation skills of students studying Japanese as a foreign language. Through this event, we hope to promote Japanese language learning at higher education level in the UK and Ireland.
:: Who can apply?
The contest is aimed at undergraduate students who are currently studying Japanese as a foreign language at a university in the UK or Ireland.
 
There are three different categories:
1. Speech Category:  For those studying a Japanese course aiming for the equivalent of JF standard C1 or C2 at a university the UK or Ireland including as an elective, optional or other university-based language course. Five finalists will be selected.
Application Deadline: 9th November 2020 (15:00)
 
2. Individual Presentation Category: For those studying a Japanese course aiming for the equivalent of JF standard B1 or B2. Participants will give a PowerPoint presentation using Japanese. The aim of the presentation is to introduce a particular theme to the audience, for example a region, event, custom, etc. from the UK or another country outside Japan. Five finalists will be selected.
Application Deadline: 7th December 2020 (15:00)
 
3. Group Presentation Category: For those studying a Japanese course aiming for the equivalent of JF standard A1 or A2. Participants will take part in groups of two to four students and give a PowerPoint presentation using Japanese. The aim of the presentation is to introduce a particular theme to the audience, for example a region, event, custom, etc. from the UK or another country outside Japan. Five groups which are selected to present during the finals day will be given a special award.
Application Deadline: 14th December 2020
*Details of JF Standard can be found here:
http://jfstandard.jp/pdf/jfs2015_pamphlet_eng.pd
 
Videos from the 15th Contest Finals Day can be viewed here - Coming soon!
Please see the files below for contest poster, FAQ and application forms for each category.
- Frequently Asked Questions
- Contest Poster
- Speech Category Application Form
- Speech Category Rules and Guidance
- Individual Presentation Category Application Form
- Group Presentation Category Application Form

We are delighted to announce that the 16th Japanese Speech Contest for University Students is open for applications!


This contest gives students the chance to make their voices heard in Japanese, and win some fantastic prizes! Finals Day will be held online, on Saturday 6th March 2021.


:: Contest Aims

The main purpose of the event is to improve the speaking and presentation skills of students studying Japanese as a foreign language. Through this event, we hope to promote Japanese language learning at higher education level in the UK and Ireland.


:: Who can apply?

The contest is aimed at undergraduate students who are currently studying Japanese as a foreign language at a university in the UK or Ireland.
 
There are three different categories:


1. Speech Category:  For those studying a Japanese course aiming for the equivalent of JF standard C1 or C2 at a university the UK or Ireland including as an elective, optional or other university-based language course. Five finalists will be selected.


Application Deadline: 9th November 2020 (15:00)
 
2. Individual Presentation Category: For those studying a Japanese course aiming for the equivalent of JF standard B1 or B2. Participants will give a PowerPoint presentation using Japanese. The aim of the presentation is to introduce a particular theme to the audience, for example a region, event, custom, etc. from the UK or another country outside Japan. Five finalists will be selected.


Application Deadline: 7th December 2020 (15:00) 

 
3. Group Presentation Category: For those studying a Japanese course aiming for the equivalent of JF standard A1 or A2. Participants will take part in groups of two to four students and give a PowerPoint presentation using Japanese. The aim of the presentation is to introduce a particular theme to the audience, for example a region, event, custom, etc. from the UK or another country outside Japan. Five groups which are selected to present during the finals day will be given a special award.


Application Deadline: 14th December 2020

 
*Details of JF Standard can be found here:
https://jfstandard.jp/pdf/jfs2015_pamphlet_eng.pdf
 
Videos from the 15th Contest Finals Day can be viewed here - Coming soon!


Please see the files below for contest poster, FAQ and application forms for each category.
- Frequently Asked Questions
- Contest Poster
- Speech Category Application Form
- Speech Category Rules and Guidance
- Individual Presentation Category Application Form
- Group Presentation Category Application Form


Date: 17 September 2020 - 14 December 2020
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